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People arrive early for the March For Our Lives rally against gun violence in Washington, DC. Photo: Alex Edelman / AFP / Getty Images

On Saturday, more than 800 March for our Lives protests are expected "in every American state and on every continent except for Antarctica," the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: The Parkland shooting was the tipping point for many, leading to a surge of the #NeverAgain movement led mostly by young people. Saturday can expect "more than half a million people" in D.C.'s march alone, the NYT reports, along with counter-protests, celebrities, and voting registration.

What to know about the marches:

  • There are counter-protests planned in several cities; a pro-second amendment University of Vermont student, Jace Laquerre, told the Times that gun rights supporters agree with students' "message to feel safe in school, we just have different solutions is all."
  • It's not just school shooting victims. Two shooting victims from Chicago, Dantrell Blake and Deshon Hannah, will also be marching in D.C. Blake told the NYT when something like the Parkland shooting happens, "it's like 'It's a massacre.' But it's a massacre in Chicago every day — and this definitely can be talked about.
  • The focus for many are the 2018 midterm elections. Per the Times, student activists will be working "to build support for candidates with whom they are aligned" on gun control issues. One organization, HeadCount, has "roughly 5,000 volunteers" attending marches around the U.S. to register people to vote.
  • Celebrities have gotten involved. People like George and Amal Clooney, Oprah Winfrey, and Steven Spielberg have been donating to the movement, per the Times. The protestors have received support from former Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama.
  • The latest movement from the White House was President Trump's tweet on Friday that his administration "will issue the rule banning BUMP STOCKS...We will BAN all devices that turn legal weapons into illegal machine guns."
"What we're doing is because we're not scared of these adults, because we have nothing to lose, we don't have an election to lose, we don't have a job to lose — we just have our lives to lose."
— High School junior and protest organizer Jaclyn Corin to the NYT

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Education: Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic.
  3. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  4. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  5. World: Hong Kong puts tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge — Pfizer to supply 40 million vaccine doses to lower-income countries.
  6. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  7. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
4 hours ago - Health

Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Biden's plan to accelerate the reopening of K-8 schools faces major challenges from a still out-of-control pandemic and more contagious coronavirus variants.

Why it matters: The longer American kids miss in-person schooling, the further they fall behind. But the uncertain state of the science on the role young children play in the pandemic continues to complicate efforts to reopen schools.

Focus group: Former Trump voters say he should never hold office again

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

"Relief" is the top emotion some swing voters who used to support Donald Trump say they felt as they watched President Biden's swearing-in, followed by "hope."

Why it matters: For voters on the bubble between parties, this moment is less about excitement for Biden or liberal politics than exhaustion and disgust with Trump and a craving for national healing. Most said Trump should be prohibited from ever holding office again.