Bannon at a rally for Roy Moore in Alabama. Photo: Brynn Anderson / AP

Steve Bannon and his allies are planning a hostile takeover of the Republican Party. And only one Senator running in 2018 will get a free pass: Ted Cruz.

Breitbart's Washington Editor Matt Boyle writes today that conservatives are "running or actively seeking out" serious primary challengers for every incumbent Republican senator running in 2018 except the Texan.

Why this matters: Bannon once said he successfully weaponized a human being in Matt Boyle. So Boyle's stories are a useful guide for what Bannon and his outside groups — funded by billionaires like the Mercers — are planning.

Here are the races and candidates Boyle teases as part of Bannon's push to support "America First" candidates in congressional and gubernatorial races nationwide:

  • Rep. Marsha Blackburn for the open Senate seat in Tennessee vacated by Bob Corker
  • Attorney general Patrick Morrisey against the establishment favorite Evan Jenkins in the West Virginia Republican primary
  • Matt Rosendale against Jon Tester in Montana
  • State Attorney General Josh Hawley in the Missouri primary to challenge Democrat Sen. Claire McCaskill
  • Danny Tarkanian against Dean Heller in Nevada
  • Kelli Ward against Jeff Flake in Arizona
  • Chris McDaniel against Roger Wicker in Mississippi
  • Gov. Rick Scott in Florida's Senate race (Scott hasn't announced whether or not he's running)
  • Roy Moore, who already beat Luther Stranger in Alabama
  • State Treasurer Josh Mandel in Ohio's Senate race
  • Blackwater founder Erik Prince, who Bannon is encouraging to run against John Barrasso in Wyoming. (NYT broke that he was considering running.)
  • Ann LePage, the wife of Maine Gov. Paul LePage, to challenge independent Sen. Angus King (like Scott, LePage hasn't made her intentions clear)

Go deeper

2 hours ago - Health

Ex-FDA head: U.S. will "definitely" see 200,000 to 300,000 virus deaths in 2020

Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb said on CBS News' "Face the Nation" that the coronavirus death toll in the U.S. will be "definitely" somewhere between 200,000 and 300,000 by the end of 2020.

Why it matters: "Whether we're closer to 200,000 or closer to 300,000 depends on what we do now and how it evolves," Gottlieb warned on Sunday as the U.S. surpassed five million confirmed coronavirus cases.

Mnuchin says Trump executive orders were cleared by Justice Department

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin insisted on "Fox News Sunday" that President Trump's executive orders on coronavirus aid were cleared by the Justice Department's Office of Legal Counsel, and said that Democrats are going to "have a lot of explaining to do" if they choose to challenge them in court.

Why it matters: Democrats and even some Republicans have criticized Trump's decision to circumvent Congress to extend unemployment benefits as executive overreach, given that the Constitution gives Congress power to appropriate spending.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 19,680,042 — Total deaths: 727,777 — Total recoveries — 11,962,565Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11 a.m. ET: 5,002,523 — Total deaths: 162,455 — Total recoveries: 1,643,118 — Total tests: 61,080,587Map.
  3. Politics: Nancy Pelosi says states don't have the funds to comply with Trump's executive order on employment — Trump adviser Larry Kudlow says he regrets suggesting the benefits could only be extended by Congress.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective — Poll: 1 in 3 Americans would decline COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Schools: Nine test positive at Georgia school where photo showing packed hallway went viral — How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.