Sep 26, 2019

LA business executive sentenced in college admissions scandal

Stephen Semprevivo. Photo: John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe/Getty Images

U.S. District Judge Indira Talwani on Thursday sentenced Los Angeles businessman Stephen Semprevivo to 4 months in prison for paying $400,000 to have his son admitted into Georgetown University as a fictitious tennis recruit in the ongoing college admissions scandal, according to USA Today.

The state of play: Semprevivo's sentencing also includes 2 years of supervised release, 500 hours of community service and a fine of $100,000. He is the 3rd parent of 35 charged to receive a sentence in the scheme, led by consultant William Singer.

Context: Semprevivo, the former chief strategy officer at sales firm Cydcor, pleaded guilty in May to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

  • Federal prosecutors recommended that Semprevivo spend 13 months in prison, pay a $95,000 fine, 12 months of supervised release and restitution of $105,000.
  • Talwani on Tuesday sentenced another LA-based business executive, Devin Sloane, to 4 months in prison and a $95,000 fine for conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud after he paid Singer $250,000 to enroll his son into the University of Southern California as a water polo recruit.
  • Actress Felicity Huffman earlier this month received a 14-day prison sentence and a $30,000 fine for conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud after she paid Singer $15,000 to have her daughter's SAT score covertly corrected.

What's next: New York attorney Gordon Caplan faces sentencing on Oct. 3 after he pleaded guilty in April to paying $75,000 for his daughter's ACT exam to be corrected.

Go deeper: The major developments in the college admissions scandal

Go deeper

Timeline: The major developments in the college admissions scandal

Michelle Janavs, whose family owns food manufacturing company Chef America, maker of Hot Pockets. Photo:
Boston Globe / Contributor

In what Department of Justice prosecutors have called the biggest admissions scam in U.S. history, parents allegedly bribed coaches and paid for forged standardized tests in a conspiracy to get their children into elite American colleges.

Driving the news: Michelle Janavs, whose family created Hot Pockets, was sentenced on Tuesday to five months in prison for agreeing to pay $300,000 in bribes to get her two daughters into universities.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Feb 25, 2020 - Economy & Business

Actress Lori Loughlin and 10 others face bribery charges

Actress Lori Loughlin exits the John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse after appearing in Federal Court on April 3 in Boston, Mass. Photo: Paul Marotta/Getty Images

Eleven defendants in the college admissions scandal, including "Full House" actress Lori Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, now face bribery charges in addition to their indictments of conspiring to commit fraud and money laundering, NBC News reports.

Why it matters: The parents could now be looking at even more serious sentences. Loughlin and Giannulli have been accused of paying $500,000 in bribes to get their daughters into the University of Southern California as crew team recruits, despite neither having previously participated in the sport.

Go deeper... Timeline: The major developments in the college admissions scandal

Keep ReadingArrowOct 22, 2019

Giuliani says he was paid $500,000 to work for indicted associate's firm

President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani speaks during a conference in Albania in July. Photo: Gent Shkullaku/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani told Reuters Monday he was paid $500,000 in consultancy work for the fraud prevention firm Fraud Guarantee, co-founded by indicted Ukrainian-American businessman Lev Parnas.

Why it matters: Parnas and Igor Fruman were arrested this month and charged with violating campaign finance laws and conspiracy. The Trump donors had helped connect Giuliani with Ukrainian officials as part of his efforts to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son.

Go deeperArrowOct 15, 2019