Spain's Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez. Photo: A. Ware/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Spain held its third election since 2015 over the weekend with the country's Socialist party declared the winners. Left-leaning allies also secured victories, but Socialist leader Pedro Sanchez still looks to be a few seats short of the needed majority to form a ruling coalition.

The intrigue: The election came on the heels of recent data showing Spain's unemployment rate, long bottom of the barrel in developed Europe, had posted its biggest quarter-on-quarter increase in 6 years. Economists had actually projected Spain's unemployment rate would fall, but it rose to 14.7%.

  • The country's economy has grown every year since 2013 and the unemployment rate fell to a 10-year low in October.
  • Spain created just under 600,000 jobs over the past 12 months, the biggest one-year gain since the summer of 2007, before the start of the country's economic crisis, which essentially lasted for 6 years.

The bottom line: The pickup in Spain's unemployment rate and growing divisions in its parliament could signal more problems for the euro zone, which is already full of them.

Go deeper: Socialists win Spain election as far-right party enters parliament for 1st time

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Updated 26 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 32,844,146 — Total deaths: 994,208 — Total recoveries: 22,715,726Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 7,078,798 — Total deaths: 204,497 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Texas city declares disaster after brain-eating amoeba found in water supply

Characteristics associated with a case of amebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri parasites. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Texas authorities have issued a warning amid concerns that the water supply in the southeast of the state may contain the brain-eating amoeba naegleria fowleri following the death of a 6-year-old boy.

Details: The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality issued a "do not use" water alert Friday for eight cities, along with the Clemens and Wayne Scott Texas Department of Criminal Justice corrections centers and the Dow Chemical plant in Freeport. This was later lifted for all places except for Lake Jackson, which issued a disaster declaration Saturday.

Updated 9 hours ago - Politics & Policy

What they're saying: Trump nominates Amy Coney Barrett for Supreme Court

Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Rose Garden of the White House on Sept. 26. Photo: Oliver Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Democratic and Republican lawmakers along with other leading political figures reacted to President Trump's Saturday afternoon nomination of federal appeals court Judge Amy Coney Barrett to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court.

What they're saying: "President Trump could not have made a better decision," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a statement. "Judge Amy Coney Barrett is an exceptionally impressive jurist and an exceedingly well-qualified nominee to the Supreme Court of the United States."