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Photo: Klaus Pressberger/SEPA.Media /Getty Images

Royal Dutch Shell paid the American Petroleum Institute, the industry's most powerful lobbying group, at least $12.5 million in 2019, the oil giant revealed.

Driving the news: The tally, which Shell tells Axios is consistent with recent years, shows up in a report Shell published yesterday on its trade group memberships.

Why it matters: The report, posted the same day Shell announced new climate pledges, provides a look at how much a major oil company pays to be part of various associations.

  • In 2019, the payments to API, which Shell says were between $12.5 million and $15 million, were far more than what they paid other groups listed in the report.
  • The next tranche lists payments of $1 million–$2.5 million to groups including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the European Chemical Industry Council.

Where it stands: Shell's first-time publication of the per-group payments arrives in an update to its April 2019 report that lays out areas where it disagrees with the posture of some associations.

  • Shell's latest review did not find grounds to quit any more groups after bailing on the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers last year over climate policy differences.
  • However, Shell says that it still has areas of "some misalignment" with several groups and will continue to push from the inside, for instance noting it will advocate that API should back carbon pricing.

The intrigue: The outcome includes staying with the Western States Petroleum Association, a group that BP abandoned in February, saying they were "unable to reconcile" their views.

  • Shell said it will press for the group to support the goal of the Paris climate agreement.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

By the numbers: Where the earmarks are wanted

Expand chart
Data: House Committee on Appropriations; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

The Dallas-Fort Worth area is being targeted for the largest collective earmark request in the country, according to a detailed breakdown of overall requests released by the House Appropriations Committee.

Why it matters: House appropriators are trying to balance bipartisan momentum for infrastructure investment with "pork-barrel" spending's checkered political history. The data dump is an effort to provide transparency for what are now termed "community project funding" requests.

Democrats open to user fees for infrastructure deal

President Biden sits Thursday with Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) as they discuss his $2.3 trillion infrastructure proposal. Photo: T.J. Kirkpatrick/The New York Times/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Some Senate Democrats are open to paying for a compromise infrastructure package by imposing user fees, including increasing the gas tax and raising money from electric car drivers through a vehicle-miles-traveled charge.

Why it matters: By inching toward the Republican position on pay-fors, some Democrats are bucking President Biden's push to offset his proposed $2.3 trillion plan by focusing only on raising taxes on corporations and the wealthy.

Progressive legal advocacy group spinning off from sponsor

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

A leading progressive legal advocacy group is spinning off from the sprawling dark money network that seeded it, the group tells Axios.

Why it matters: Demand Justice's decision to separate from the Sixteen Thirty Fund, a "fiscal sponsor" for scores of largely left-wing organizations, will provide the public with its first detailed look behind the curtain of the influential progressive nonprofit.

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