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Photo: Klaus Pressberger/SEPA.Media /Getty Images

Royal Dutch Shell paid the American Petroleum Institute, the industry's most powerful lobbying group, at least $12.5 million in 2019, the oil giant revealed.

Driving the news: The tally, which Shell tells Axios is consistent with recent years, shows up in a report Shell published yesterday on its trade group memberships.

Why it matters: The report, posted the same day Shell announced new climate pledges, provides a look at how much a major oil company pays to be part of various associations.

  • In 2019, the payments to API, which Shell says were between $12.5 million and $15 million, were far more than what they paid other groups listed in the report.
  • The next tranche lists payments of $1 million–$2.5 million to groups including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the European Chemical Industry Council.

Where it stands: Shell's first-time publication of the per-group payments arrives in an update to its April 2019 report that lays out areas where it disagrees with the posture of some associations.

  • Shell's latest review did not find grounds to quit any more groups after bailing on the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers last year over climate policy differences.
  • However, Shell says that it still has areas of "some misalignment" with several groups and will continue to push from the inside, for instance noting it will advocate that API should back carbon pricing.

The intrigue: The outcome includes staying with the Western States Petroleum Association, a group that BP abandoned in February, saying they were "unable to reconcile" their views.

  • Shell said it will press for the group to support the goal of the Paris climate agreement.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.

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