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Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Senate Democrats intend to force a roll call vote next week on EPA regulations that scrapped Obama-era carbon emissions rules for power plants and replaced them with a more modest alternative.

Why it matters: Floor votes on global warming are rare, and the bid to scuttle the Trump administration rule signals Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer's (D-N.Y.) increasing emphasis on the topic.

  • The planned vote comes roughly 2 weeks after Schumer said a sweeping climate bill would be "one of the first things we put on the floor" if Democrats regain the majority in the 2020 elections.

What's next: Schumer's office said Democrats would force a vote under the Congressional Review Act, a mid-1990s law that gives Congress power to overturn final regulations.

  • Resolutions under the law are immune from filibusters, meaning only a majority vote is needed for passage.

But, but, but: The move is very likely more of a messaging effort than a realistic chance at altering Trump administration policy.

  • Schumer's announcement says it will be the first of several on various topics, including healthcare, to show how GOP leadership has "turned the upper chamber into a legislative graveyard for priorities of the American people."

The big picture: Over the summer, the EPA issued final rules that require states to make coal-fired units more efficient over time, but the regulations lack binding CO2-cutting targets. They replaced a wider 2015 regulation, which never took effect, that sought to drive more wide-ranging power sector changes.

Go deeper: How the EPA's climate rule rollback could reach beyond coal

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

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