Feb 7, 2020 - Energy & Environment

The Senate's ad-hoc climate group expands

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A recently formed bipartisan Senate group that's working on climate change is adding new members.

Driving the news: The Climate Solutions Caucus said yesterday that Republicans Marco Rubio and Susan Collins are joining, and so are Democrats Debbie Stabenow and Tammy Baldwin.

  • The Washington Examiner reports that Ohio Republican Rob Portman plans to join, too.

Catch up fast: Delaware Democrat Chris Coons and Indiana Republican Mike Braun formed the group late last year.

  • Other members are Democrats Jeanne Shaheen and Michael Bennet, Republicans Mitt Romney and Lindsey Graham, and Angus King, an independent who caucuses with Democrats.

Why it matters: It's the latest sign of more Republicans becoming interested in climate at some level.

Reality check: Informal caucuses don't typically have much influence on Capitol Hill, and it remains to be seen whether this one can help move legislation going forward.

Go deeper: Bipartisan House duo explore "clean energy standard"

Go deeper

Senators huddle over dinner with carbon-tax backers

Sen. Mike Braun. Photo: Sarah Silbiger/Stringer/Getty Images

Nearly two dozen proponents of a carbon tax across the corporate, economic and advocacy spectrum pitched their climate plan to a bipartisan group of senators over dinner this week.

Why it matters: It's a concrete sign of the growing pressure facing lawmakers to pass big policy on climate change, even though the chances of that happening any time soon remain slim.

Bipartisan House duo explore "clean energy standard"

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

A bipartisan House duo is floating a new plan that's both a throwback idea and a sign of today's climate politics.

Driving the news: Rep. David McKinley (R-W.Va.) and Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-Ore.) want to require utilities to greatly cut carbon emissions by mid-century.

As Congress talks climate policy, carbon price gets no love

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

New lobbying urging Congress to support a price on carbon emissions is not convincing lawmakers to warm up to the policy.

Why it matters: A carbon price is widely considered one of the most economically efficient ways to tackle climate change. But, economics be damned, its politics remain deeply unpopular.