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Net neutrality protestors put pressure on Republicans to vote for the resolution rolling back the repeal. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Senate on Wednesday approved a resolution that rolls back the Federal Communications Commission’s 2017 repeal of net neutrality rules that required internet providers treat all content in the same way.

The big picture: The resolution doesn’t have much of a chance in the House — but Democrats are hoping that it puts the issue front and center with voters.

The details: The measure passed 52-47. Republicans Sens. Susan Collins (Maine), John Kennedy (La.), and Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) backed the resolution, with neither Kennedy nor Murkowski voicing support before Wednesday. The resolution restores rules that ban internet service providers from blocking or throttling content or providing paid fast lanes.

  • "This vote comes down to one thing and one thing only: the extent to which you trust your cable company," Kennedy told reporters after the vote.
  • He said the pressure put on him by activists who supported the measure had not been a factor in his decision.

What they’re saying: Sen. Brian Schatz pushed back on the idea that the restoration effort has limited chance in the House. “I would also point out that a lot of the Republican primaries are over, and some of these Republicans running in tough districts are going to be looking for opportunities to distinguish themselves as independent thinkers and this provides them that opportunity,” he said after a procedural vote earlier in the day.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - World

2 Americans accused of helping Ghosn escape to Japanese authorities

Former Nissan chair Carlos Ghosn during a news conference in Jounieh, Lebanon, last September. Photo: Hasan Shaaban/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Two Americans accused of helping former Nissan chair Carlos Ghosn flee Japan in a box in 2019 were handed over to Japanese custody Monday, their lawyer said.

Why it matters: The extradition of Michael Taylor, 60, a private security specialist and former Green Beret, and his son Peter Maxwell Taylor, 27, ends a months-long fight to remain in the U.S.

Rep. Rice demands Cuomo resign after 3rd woman accuses him of misconduct

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo during a February news conference in New York City. Photo: Seth Wenig/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Rep. Kathleen Rice (D-N.Y.) on Monday evening called for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) to resign, after a third woman accused him of inappropriate behavior.

Driving the news: Anna Ruch, a former member of the Obama administration and the 2020 Biden campaign, told the New York Times Monday that Cuomo asked to kiss her at a New York City wedding reception in September 2019.

Scoop: Inside the GOP's plan to retake the House

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Bloomberg via Getty Images

House Republicans will reclaim their majority in 2022 by offering candidates who are women, minorities or veterans, a memo obtained by Axios says.

Why it matters: The document, drafted by a super PAC blessed by House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, names top Democrats to target — Jared Golden of Maine, Matt Cartwright of Pennsylvania and Ron Kind of Wisconsin — and the type of Republican candidates to beat them.