A Cal Fire firefighter monitors a burning home as the Camp Fire moves through the area. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The California Camp Fire has burned more than 100,000 acres and is at 20% containment Saturday morning as it ravages the state as the most destructive wildfire in its history.

The trends: The Camp Fire that tore through Paradise, California, is not an anomaly, Axios' Andrew Freedman explains. The Golden State is experiencing one of its worst wildfire seasons on record, having had its hottest month in state history in July, along with the largest fire the state has ever recorded. According to Aon Insurance meteorologist Steve Bowen, 7 of the top 20 most destructive fires in the state have occurred since October 2017.

By the numbers: The fire has destroyed at least 6,713 homes, businesses and other structures.

  • 80% to 90% of the homes in Paradise have been destroyed, according to CNN.
  • At least nine people have been killed.
  • 35 people have been reported missing.

This fire surpasses the damage from the previous record-holder, which was the deadly Tubbs Fire, which devastated Santa Rosa in the state's wine country just 13 months ago.

Cal Fire Captain Steve Millosovich carries a cage full of cats that were found in the road after the Camp Fire moved through the area. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Abandoned burned out cars sit in the middle of the road after the Camp Fire moved through the area. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A chimney remains at the site of a home that burned as the Camp Fire moves through the area. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A home burns as the Camp Fire moves through the area. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Hospital workers at the Feather River Hospital work in a triage area while evacuating patients as the Camp Fire moves through the area. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
A business burns as the Camp Fire moves through the area. Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Go deeper: California wildfire is the most destructive in state history

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Downtown Chicago hit by widespread looting

Police officers inspect a damaged Best Buy in Chicago that was looted and vandalized. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago police responded to hundreds of people looting stores and causing widespread property damage in the city's downtown overnight, resulting in at least one exchange of gunfire, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The state of play: Police superintendent David Brown said the event was a coordinated response after an officer shot a suspect on Sunday evening, per CBS Chicago.

McDonald's sues former CEO, alleging he lied about relationships with employees

Former McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

McDonald's on Monday sued its former CEO Steve Easterbrook, seeking to recoup tens of millions in severance benefits while alleging he took part in and concealed undisclosed relationships with company employees, per the New York Times.

Why it matters: Corporations have traditionally chosen to ignore executive misbehavior to avoid bad press, but they have become more proactive — especially with the rise of the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter movements — in addressing issues head-on.

The transformation of the Fed

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The Federal Reserve is undergoing an overhaul. Conceived to keep inflation in check and oversee the country's money supply, the central bank is now essentially directing the economy and moving away from worries about rising prices.

What we're hearing: The move to act less quickly and forcefully to tamp down on inflation has been in the works for years, but some economists fear that the Fed is moving too far from its original mandate.