Evan Vucci / AP

News outlets have published stories over the past 24 hours about the Trump administration's lack of transparency — and avoidance of the scrutiny that comes with televised press briefings. Now an updated White House schedule says Sean Spicer will do an "on camera" briefing at 1:30pm ET. That's the jargon term for a briefing you can watch on TV.

  • Trump has directed his communications team to stop doing daily televised press briefings, which are traditional in recent White House history.
  • The White House didn't allow news outlets to use either audio or video of Monday's briefing, which resulted in CNN's Jim Acosta expressing outrage live on air.
  • News outlets reported yesterday that Spicer would likely be playing a more behind-the-scenes role as a communications strategist rather than as the administration's TV face.

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Wind and solar power hit record global market shares in first half of 2020

Reproduced from Ember; Chart: Axios Visuals

A steep decline in coal-fired power combined with rising wind and solar output drove the carbon-free sources to record global market share in the first half of 2020, per a new analysis from the environmental think tank Ember.

Why it matters: The report shows how the coronavirus pandemic is speeding the ongoing shakeup of the global power mix — but also how it's occurring too slowly to reach international climate goals.

Trump vows to block stimulus funding for mail-in voting and USPS

President Trump on Thursday told Fox Business' Maria Bartiromo that Democratic demands to fund mail-in voting and the U.S. Postal Service in ongoing coronavirus stimulus negotiations were a non-starter.

Why it matters: Trump directly linked Democrats' desired $3.6 billion for mail-in voting and $25 billion for the USPS to his continued baseless claims that increased mail-in voting will lead to widespread voter fraud.

BodyArmor takes aim at Gatorade's sports drink dominance

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

BodyArmor is making noise in the sports drink market, announcing seven new athlete partnerships last week, including Christian McCaffrey, Sabrina Ionescu and Ronald Acuña Jr.

Why it matters: It wants to market itself as a worthy challenger to the throne that Gatorade has occupied for nearly six decades.