Trump departs the White House for Florida. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

There's an operational reshuffle coming at the top level of the White House. Senior Trump administration official Johnny DeStefano is set to assume greater responsibilities and influence, including overseeing the beleaguered White House political operation.

What's coming: Two sources with direct knowledge of the internal deliberations say DeStefano is expected to assume most of deputy chief of staff Rick Dearborn's responsibilities. Dearborn is expected to leave the White House sometime in the new year.

The backdrop: There's been an intense focus recently on the performance of the White House political shop in general and its leader Bill Stepien in particular. We were first to report in detail about the widespread concerns about the operation's performance; and WashPo and others reported on a recent tense meeting in the Oval Office that climaxed with Trump's former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski eviscerating Stepien.

Details of the reshuffle:

  • DeStefano, a Capitol Hill veteran and former leadership aide, is expected to take charge of the Office of Public Liaison — the White House's outreach to interest groups — and is expected to maintain his role overseeing personnel appointments across the administration.
  • DeStefano is also expected to lead the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs — making him responsible for maintaining the White House's relationships with state legislators, governors, tribal leaders, mayors, and other political leaders across the country.
  • The move makes DeStefano one of the administration's key point people to the wider Republican universe.
  • DeStefano did not respond to a request for comment.

I'm told one role of Dearborn's that DeStefano is less likely to take is overseeing Marc Short's Office of Legislative Affairs. Short is expected to report directly to Chief of Staff John Kelly.

Get more stories like this by signing up for our weekly political lookahead newsletter, Axios Sneak Peek.

Go deeper

Trump claims TikTok will be banned if not sold by Sept. 15

President Trump said Monday that TikTok will be shut down in the U.S. if it hasn't been bought by Microsoft or another company by Sept. 15.

Why it matters: Trump appears to have backed off his threat to immediately ban TikTok after speaking with Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, who said Sunday that the company will pursue discussions with TikTok’s Chinese parent company ByteDance to purchase the app in the U.S.

Updated 15 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 18,147,574 — Total deaths: 690,573 — Total recoveries — 10,753,815Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 4,687,828 — Total deaths: 155,062 — Total recoveries: 1,468,689 — Total tests: 56,812,162Map.
  3. Politics: White House will require staff to undergo randomized coronavirus testing — Pelosi says Birx "enabled" Trump on misinformation.
  4. Business: Virtual school is another setback for retail — The pandemic hasn't hampered health care.
  5. Public health: Former FDA chief says MLB outbreaks should be warning sign for schools.

Filing suggests Manhattan DA is investigating Trump for possible fraud

Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP

The Manhattan District Attorney's office suggested for the first time Monday that it's investigating President Trump and his company for "alleged bank and insurance fraud," the New York Times first reported.

The state of play: The disclosure was made in a filing in federal court that seeks to force accounting firm Mazars USA to comply with a subpoena for eight years of Trump's personal and corporate tax returns.