Toyota Mirai. Photo: Anadolu Agency

Toyota plans to unveil a new type of "personal electric vehicle" this week and will outline a broad electrification strategy heavily reliant on partnerships with Chinese manufacturers, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: Despite its longtime lead in hybrids like the Prius, Toyota is seen as lagging on the industrywide shift to battery electric vehicles (BEVs), especially as China and Europe have moved to mandate more zero-emission vehicles.

What's new: On Friday in Japan, Toyota senior executives will share details of the company's electric vehicle pipeline and its future EV business model, according to a source with knowledge of the plan.

  • New products will include "personal EVs" and other battery-powered passenger cars.
  • The company also plans to discuss other aspects of its electrification effort, including collaboration with unnamed Chinese partners on batteries and future battery-powered vehicles.
  • The strategy is not being widely publicized in the U.S. because of sensitivity to strained U.S.-China trade relations.

Context: Toyota has favored hydrogen fuel cell vehicles like its Mirai sedan, but sales have been slow. The company is still committed to fuel cell technology long-term, but is pivoting toward trucks and other uses for now.

  • In April, Toyota said it would offer free access to its hybrid-vehicle patents through 2030, in part to extend hybrid technology and stave off the challenge from fully electric cars.
  • Toyota previously said that by the early 2020s it would have 10 BEV models that it plans to first sell in China and then gradually introduce to Japan, the U.S. and Europe.
  • By 2030, Toyota aims to hit annual electrified vehicle sales of 5.5 million units globally, including hybrids and more than 1 million zero-emission vehicles, with many fuel-cell-powered commercial trucks replacing diesel trucks in the 2030s, per Ward's Auto.  

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President Trump stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett after she took the constitutional oath to serve as a Supreme Court justice during a White House ceremony Monday night .Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Trump said Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation to the Supreme Court and her subsequent taking of the constitutional oath Monday was a "momentous day," as she she vowed to serve "without any fear or favour."

  • But as Republicans applauded the third conservative justice in four years, many Democrats including Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) warned of consequences to the rush to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ahead of the Nov. 3 election, with progressives leading calls to expand the court.
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CRISPR pioneer: "Science is on the ballot" in 2020

Photo: "Axios on HBO"

In her three decades in science, Jennifer Doudna said she has seen a gradual erosion of trust in the profession, but the recent Nobel Prize winner told "Axios on HBO" that the institution itself has been under assault from the current administration.

  • "I think science is on the ballot," Doudna said in the interview.

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Ted Cruz doesn't think the Hunter Biden attacks are working

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The big picture: After watching the Trump-Biden debate with "Axios on HBO" on Thursday night, Cruz said he thought Trump had done very well. But when asked whether he thought voters were moved by the release of the Hunter Biden emails, Cruz replied, "I don't think it moves a single voter."

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