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Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik / AP

Saudi Arabia and Russia jointly said they favor extending the production-limiting deal between OPEC and some other big producers through the first quarter of 2018.

Why it matters: The comments by the world's largest producers signals what could happen when OPEC meets May 25 to weigh the future of the six-month production agreement that began in January.

"I think there is general consensus that this is the right approach and the right thing to do," said Saudi Energy minister Khalid Al-Falih at a Beijing appearance, according to several accounts.

The big bounce: Oil prices rose in trading on Monday after the announcement. Via CNBC, both West Texas Intermediate and Brent crude gained over 3 percent Monday morning.

What they're saying: "I think OPEC and Russia recognize that in order to get the market back on their side they will need 'shock and awe' tactics where they need to go above and beyond a simple extension of the deal," Virendra Chauhan, an analyst at Energy Aspects, told Reuters.

  • In a joint statement, the two countries' oil ministers said they want to ensure "market stability, predictability and sustainable development" and pledged to agreed to do "whatever it takes" to stabilize the market and reduce commercial inventories to their five-year average level.

To be sure:

Output growth by U.S. shale producers even amid modest prices is a check on OPEC's influence. In a research note late Sunday night, Goldman Sachs noted that the U.S. rig count climbed for another week to reach a level that's 125% higher than it was a year ago.

Go deeper

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.

Wanted: New media bosses, everywhere

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Reuters, HuffPost and Wired are all looking for new editors. Soon, The New York Times will be too.

Why it matters: The new hires will reflect a new generation — one that's addicted to technology, demands accountability and expects diversity to be a priority.