Photo: Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

With allegations mounting against Alabama's Republican nominee Roy Moore, Politico's Jeff Greenfield writes that Democrats and left-leaning media are going through a "painful re-examination" of the allegations against President Bill Clinton:

"In the case of Clinton, his public policies cannot erase the serious doubts about whether a sexual predator occupied the White House for eight years....Unless and until partisans across the board stop justifying unconscionable behavior out of political self-interest, the more likely it is that the pervasive cynicism about the process, and everyone involved in it, will fester and grow."

Greenfield's media examples:

  • New York Times' Editorial Board: "Remember former President Bill Clinton, whose popularity endures despite a long string of allegations of sexual misconduct and, in one case, rape — all of which he has denied."
  • MSNBC's Chris Hayes tweeted: "As gross and cynical and hypocritical as the right's 'what about Bill Clinton' stuff is, it's also true that Democrats and the center left are overdue for a real reckoning with the allegations against him."
  • David Remnick wrote in the New Yorker: "That so many women have summoned the courage to make public their allegations against Weinstein, Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, and Bill O'Reilly—or that many have come to reconsider some of the claims made against Bill Clinton—represents a cultural passage."
  • The Atlantic's Caitlin Flanagan wrote: "It was a pattern of behavior; it included an alleged violent assault; the women involved had far more credible evidence than many of the most notorious accusations that have come to light in the past five weeks. But Clinton was not left to the swift and pitiless justice that today's accused men have experienced. "

Go deeper

"Not enough": Protesters react to no murder charges in Breonna Taylor case

A grand jury on Wednesday indicted Brett Hankison, one of the Louisville police officers who entered Breonna Taylor's home in March, on three counts of wanton endangerment for firing shots blindly into neighboring apartments.

Details: Angering protesters, the grand jury did not indict any of the three officers involved in the botched drug raid on homicide or manslaughter charges related to the death of Taylor.

Two officers shot in Louisville amid Breonna Taylor protests

Police officers stand guard during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Ben Hendren/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Louisville Metro Police Department said two officers were shot downtown in the Kentucky city late Wednesday, just hours after a grand jury announced an indictment in the Breonna Taylor case.

Details: A police spokesperson told a press briefing a suspect was in custody and that the injuries of both officers were not life-threatening. One officer was "alert and stable" and the other was undergoing surgery, he said.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

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