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LM Otero / AP

"I'm not going to say to the president of the United States 'Let's just walk away from the Paris accord,'" Energy Secretary Rick Perry said Tuesday at a Bloomberg New Energy Finance conference in New York. "But, what I'm going to say is that I think we probably should renegotiate it."

  • Why his position matters: Perry joins Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump in thinking the US should stay in the 2015 climate deal. Steve Bannon and Reince Priebus are on the other side.
  • Next steps: President Trump campaigned on withdrawing from or even canceling the deal (the latter which isn't technically possible), and will make a decision by the G-7 meeting at the end of May. A meeting of climate negotiators earlier in May in Germany could shed some light on which way the administration is leaning.
  • Speaking of Germany: At the conference, Perry called out Germany in particular for displaying ambitious rhetoric on addressing climate change but instituting policies, such as closing down nuclear plants, that ultimately increase its greenhouse gas emissions.

Go deeper

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Technology

AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.