Jul 21, 2017

Report: Trump asked about power to pardon aides, family, himself

Alex Brandon / AP

President Trump has asked advisers about "his power to pardon aides, family members and even himself in connection with" the Russia probe, the Washington Post reports citing a source familiar with the discussions. Another source said Trump's lawyers were "discussing pardoning powers among themselves."

  • Per several aides, Trump's lawyers are "are actively compiling a list of [special counsel Robert] Mueller's alleged potential conflicts of interest, which they say could serve as a way to stymie his work."
  • "The president is also irritated by the notion that Mueller's probe could reach into his and his family's finances."
  • Trump "has told aides he was especially disturbed after learning Mueller would be able to access several years of his tax returns."
  • Trump's lawyers declined to comment. Mark Corallo, the spokesman for his legal team, resigned Thursday, the Post reports.

Go deeper

Centrist Democrats beseech 2020 candidates: "Stand up to Bernie" or Trump wins

Bernie Sanders rallies in Las Vegas, Nevada on Feb. 21. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Center-left think tank Third Way urgently called on the Democratic front-runners of the 2020 presidential election to challenge Sen. Bernie Sanders on the South Carolina debate stage on Feb. 25, in a memo provided to Axios' Mike Allen on Saturday.

What they're saying: "At the Las Vegas debate ... you declined to really challenge Senator Sanders. If you repeat this strategy at the South Carolina debate this week, you could hand the nomination to Sanders, likely dooming the Democratic Party — and the nation — to Trump and sweeping down-ballot Republican victories in November."

Situational awareness

Warren Buffett. Photo: Daniel Zuchnik/WireImage

Catch up on today's biggest news:

  1. Warren Buffett releases annual letter, reassures investors about future of Berkshire Hathaway
  2. Greyhound bars immigration sweeps
  3. U.S. military officially stops offensive operations in Afghanistan
  4. America's future looks a lot like Nevada
  5. Centrist Democrats beseech 2020 candidates: "Stand up to Bernie" or Trump wins

America's future looks a lot like Nevada

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Today's Nevada caucus will foreshadow the future of American politics well beyond 2020.

Why it matters: The U.S. is in the midst of a demographic transformation, and the country's future looks a lot like Nevada's present. Today's results, in addition to shaping the 2020 race, will help tell us where politics is headed in a rapidly changing country.