Sep 20, 2019

Global renewable energy growth bounces back in 2019

Photo: Murat Taner/Getty Images

Growth of renewable power capacity resumed in 2019 after stalling last year, the International Energy Agency said in an estimate Friday.

The big picture: Last year was the first time since 2001 that growth was flat, but IEA estimates that capacity additions this year will grow almost 12% to nearly 200 gigawatts. However, despite the growth, it's not consistent with keeping warming in check. "Renewable capacity additions need to grow by more than 300 GW on average each year between 2018 and 2030 to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement," the agency said.

Go deeper: Massive companies' green commitments can't save the planet

Go deeper

Massive companies' green commitments can't save the planet

Google campus in Mountain View, Calif. Photo: Amy Osborne/AFP/Getty Images

Amazon unveiled sweeping new energy and climate plans yesterday, and hours later, Google announced its biggest renewable power buys ever.

Why it matters: While the announcements by 2 of the world's biggest companies are stark signs that corporate giants are getting more aggressive about climate change, corporate commitments won't change the underlying trend of global carbon emissions on track to bring warming that blows past the Paris Agreement's temperature goals.

Go deeperArrowSep 20, 2019

New warning about SUVs' climate toll

Reproduced from IEA; Note: Other passenger cars refers to internal combustion passenger cars excluding SUVs; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new International Energy Agency analysis looks at carbon emissions from the global growth in SUV sales and calls it "nothing short of surprising."

Why it matters: Wringing carbon out of transportation is vital to fighting climate change and that's going to be harder if SUV sales keep growing fast.

Go deeperArrowOct 15, 2019

Report: Key global economic indicators hit lowest level since 2016

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Headline economic indicators have hit their lowest levels since spring 2016 as the global economy sinks into a "synchronised stagnation" period, research by the Brookings Institution and the Financial Times published Sunday shows.

Why it matters: The Tracking Indexes for the Global Economic Recovery research shows weak growth in some major economies and "essentially no growth or even mild contraction" ahead of International Monetary Fund and World Bank meetings in Washington, D.C., this week — the first with Kristalina Georgieva as the IMF’s new managing director.

Go deeperArrowOct 14, 2019