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Ransomware hack targeting 2 million an hour

This photo shows fingers on a laptop keyboard in North Andover, Mass. Elise Amendola / AP

A ransomware attack sweeping the globe right now is launching about 8,000 different versions of the virus script at Barracuda's customers, Eugene Weiss, lead platform architect at Barracuda, told Axios, and it's hitting at a steady rate of about 2 million attacks per hour.

Weiss' gut reaction on this hack: "What's remarkable about this one is just the sheer volume of it."

Here's what you need to know on the latest:

  • Automated hacking: "Nobody actually sat there and made 8,000 digital modifications," Weiss said. The way they do it is by using a kit that essentially automates code variations.
  • What to watch out for: An incoming email spoofing the destination host, with a subject about "Herbalife" or a "copier" file delivery. Two of the latest variants Barracuda has detected include a paragraph about legalese to make it seem official, or a line about how a "payment is attached," which tricks you to click since, as Weiss puts it, "everyone wants a payment."
  • The hackers are using social engineering to get people to click. That's increasingly becoming a trend, per Weiss. It's "less pure technical hacks" and instead using psychological tactics "get someone to click on something they shouldn't be."
  • If you remember one thing: "Don't click the link that is absolutely the most essential thing."
  • The targets: Email addresses at businesses or institutional groups in the U.S. or Canada.
  • It's likely not a nation-state perpetrating the hack, since the hackers' motives are financial. Instead it's a small, sophisticated group of criminals. The attacks are originating in Vietnam for the most part, as well as India, Colombia, Turkey, Greece, and a few other countries.
  • The future of global hacks: "At some point in the future you may see multilingual internationalized" hacks, Weiss said. In other words, they could be language-targeted. While the messages from these particular hackers are all in English so far, the virus programs are assessing the target computers' language settings.

Go deeper: The growing threat of ransomware attacks

Jonathan Swan 3 hours ago
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Trump's trade plan that would blow up the WTO

President Trump announces tariffs on steel and aluminum earlier this month, flanked by Steven Mnuchin, Wilbur Ross, Robert Lighthizer, and Peter Navarro. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

For months, President Donald Trump has been badgering his economic advisors to give him broad, unilateral authority to raise tariffs — a move that would all but break the World Trade Organization.

His favorite word: “reciprocal.” He’s always complaining to staff about the fact that the U.S. has much lower tariffs on some foreign goods than other countries have on the same American-made goods. The key example is cars: The European Union has a 10 percent tariff on all cars, including those manufactured in America, and China hits all foreign-made cars with 25 percent tariffs. But the U.S. only charges 2.5 percent for foreign cars we import.

Jonathan Swan 3 hours ago
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Congress considers a monster spending bill

Sens. Chuck Schumer and Mitch McConnell walk to the Senate chamber last month. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

The House and Senate need to pass their massive 2018 spending bill before the government shuts down on Friday. Senior sources from both parties on Capitol Hill tell me they expect they'll get the deal done — though there's plenty of last minute haggling.

The big picture: This spending bill will cost more than $1 trillion and will further add to the deficit, which is likely to reach at least $800 billion for the 2018 fiscal year.  Republican leaders and Trump will sell the spending package as a much-needed boost to military spending. House defense hawks, led by House Armed Services Chairman Mac Thornberry, campaigned aggressively for this boost. And Democrats will rightly be thrilled that they've forced Republicans to capitulate to fund so many of their domestic priorities.