Oct 22, 2019

2 Proud Boys members sentenced for New York City brawl

Proud Boys founder Gavin McInnes. Photo: Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis/Getty Images

Two members of the far-right group Proud Boys were sentenced Tuesday to four years in prison following a "political street fight" with protesters in New York City last year, reports the New York Times.

Why it matters: New York state Supreme Court Justice Mark Dwyer told the court that the sentence was meant to send a message to others who might turn to violence over political differences. "I know enough about history to know what happened in Europe in the 30s," he told the court.

  • A group of 10 Proud Boys attacked four people who were protesting a speech being given by Proud Boys founder Gavin McInnes at the Metropolitan Republican Club.
  • Prosecutor Joshua Steinglass asked that the men, Maxwell Hare and John Kinsman, be sentenced to five years instead because "violence meant to intimidate and silence" doesn't belong in American society.

The big picture: This attack mirrors previous clashes between the right and left that ended violently, such as the 2017 rallies in Charlottesville that left one person dead.

Go deeper: Far-right and anti-fascist protesters clash in Portland, Ore.

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Read: Appeals court rules Congress can access Trump's tax records

President Trump speaks during a Cabinet Meeting at the White House on Oct. 21. Photo: Brendan Smialowsky/AFP via Getty Images

Congress can seek eight years of President Trump's tax records, according to a federal appeals court ruling on Wednesday.

Why it matters: It's a major setback for Trump, who's tried to block every attempt to make his tax returns public and plans to take the case to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Nov 14, 2019

Trump asks the Supreme Court to protect his financial records from Congress

Photo: Mark Wilson / Staff

President Trump's private lawyers asked Chief Justice John Roberts on Friday to stay an appeals court decision giving the House Oversight and Reform Committee the OK to subpoena the president's personal and business financial records.

The big picture: The request comes a day after Trump asked the Supreme Court to keep his longtime accounting firm, Mazars USA, from turning over his tax returns to the Manhattan district attorney. Trump has filed at least three lawsuits to block the release of his tax returns.

Go deeperArrowNov 15, 2019

Judge dismisses Trump's lawsuit over tax returns

Photo: Steven Ferdman/WireImage/Getty Images

A federal judge in D.C. has thrown out President Trump's lawsuit that aims to block the House Ways and Means Committee from getting access to his tax returns through a new New York state law, reports NBC News.

Why it matters: Trump has tried to block every attempt to make his tax returns public and plans to take this case to the Supreme Court.

Go deeperArrowNov 11, 2019