Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump has signed 41 bills into law since assuming office, and has boasted about the magnitude of his successes compared to past presidents: "I think probably seldom has any president and administration done more or had more success so early on, including a record number of resolutions to eliminate job-killing regulations."

One quick thing: At this point in his presidency, Trump has not signed more laws that any other president. In fact, as of his 150-day mark, Trump has signed the same number as George H.W. Bush, and less than Presidents Roosevelt, Truman, Carter, and Clinton, PolitiFact noted.

While there has been no landmark legislation, there are some noteworthy things that happened these last five months while our attention was elsewhere:

  1. Trump used the Congressional Review Act to pass 15 laws, which is a fast-track tactic to reverse Obama-era regulations.
  2. The U.S. is back in the market to host a world expo thanks to the "U.S. Wants to Compete for a World Expo Act." This comes as Minnesota is bidding to host a world fair in 2023.
  3. Federal employees will now be reimbursed for taking an Uber, Lyft, or other ride-sharing services when on official government travel.
  4. The late Law and Order actor and former senator, Fred D. Thompson, had a courthouse in Tennessee named in his honor.
  5. Defense Secretary James Mattis was granted immunity from a decades-old law that states whomever holds that position needs to be at least seven years out of military service. Mattis served four years ago.

The one new policy: Under the Department of Veterans Affairs Accountability and Whistleblower Protection Act, Trump established the Office of Accountability at the Department of Veteran Affairs with the intent to bring accountability back to the VA. Senior officials in the Department now have the ability to fire employees who don't meet expectations, and there are new protections for those who reveal wrongdoings within the agency.

For a dive into the other laws Trump has passed, more here.

Go deeper

GOP implosion: Trump threats, payback

Spotted last week on a work van in Evansville, Ind. Photo: Sam Owens/The Evansville Courier & Press via Reuters

The GOP is getting torn apart by a spreading revolt against party leaders for failing to stand up for former President Trump and punish his critics.

Why it matters: Republican leaders suffered a nightmarish two months in Washington. Outside the nation’s capital, it's even worse.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

The limits of Biden's plan to cancel student debt

Data: New York Fed Consumer Credit Panel/Equifax; Chart: Axios Visuals

There’s a growing consensus among Americans who want President Biden to cancel student debt — but addressing the ballooning debt burden is much more complicated than it seems.

Why it matters: Student debt is stopping millions of Americans from buying homes, buying cars and starting families. And the crisis is rapidly getting worse.

Why made-for-TV moments matter during the pandemic

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Erin Schaff-Pool, Biden Inaugural Committee via Getty Images

In a world where most Americans are isolated and forced to laugh, cry and mourn without friends or family by their side, viral moments can offer critical opportunities to unite the country or divide it.

Driving the news: President Biden's inauguration was produced to create several made-for-social viral moments, a tactic similar to what the Democratic National Committee and the Biden campaign pulled off during the Democratic National Convention.