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Reproduced from an Sivak Applied Research report; Table: Axios Visuals

A brief new study makes the case that Democrats are curtailing their travel more than Republicans during the pandemic.

Why it matters: Transportation analyst Michael Sivak's report provides another window into the forces that have caused a steep drop in oil demand during the crisis.

  • It's also another indication of how political leanings are affecting behavior, a topic probably most discussed with respect to mask-wearing.

How it works: Sivak overlaid Federal Highway Administration data with Cook Political Report analysis of states' political leanings in the upcoming presidential election.

The intrigue: The short analysis published in Green Car Congress argues that while the data show the decline in driving on urban roads is somewhat greater than the decline on rural roads, there's more afoot.

  • "Although the states with preference for the Democratic presidential candidate tend to be more urban than the states with preference for the Republican presidential candidate, the urban/rural difference does not fully account for the main finding."

Go deeper

Cook Political Report moves Ohio and Iowa from "lean Republican" to "toss up" in 2020 race

Photos: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images; Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Cook Political Report shifted Tuesday its 2020 presidential election outlook for Ohio and Iowa — two key battleground states that President Trump won in 2016 — moving them from "lean Republican" to "toss up."

Why it matters: It represents a further narrowing of the electoral map for Trump with only five weeks until Election Day, especially because Cook projects that neither state is currently a decisive tipping point for Joe Biden.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Politics: Biden unveils "wartime" COVID strategyBiden's COVID-19 bubble.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong to put tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

Trump impeachment trial to start week of Feb. 8, Schumer says

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. Photo: The Washington Post via Getty

The Senate will begin former President Trump's impeachment trial the week of Feb. 8, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced Friday on the Senate floor.

The state of play: Schumer announced the schedule after reaching an agreement with Republicans. The House will transmit the article of impeachment against the former president late Monday.