Apr 14, 2018

Britain and France tout praises of coordinated strikes in Syria

French President Macron, US President Trump and Britain's Prime Minister May at the G7 Summitt. Photo: STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN/AFP/Getty Images

The United Kingdom's Prime Minister Theresa May and French President Emmanuel Macron have released statements confirming the success of coordinated strikes led by the U.S. in Syria in response to chemical attacks on civilians brought by the Assad regime, and sang the praises of the outcome which destroyed three significant chemical weapons plants.

The three leaders agreed that the military strikes taken against the Syrian Regime’s chemical weapons sites had been a success.
— All three leaders have spoken to each other since the strikes, confirmed a Downing Street spokesperson.
Theresa May
  • "Following the successful strikes made against the Syrian Regime’s chemical weapons sites earlier today by the UK, France and United States, Prime Minister Theresa May is speaking to a number of her fellow world leaders."
  • "The PM explained that the action the UK has taken with our American and French allies was limited, carefully targeted and designed to alleviate humanitarian suffering, degrade the Syrian Regime’s chemical weapons capability."
  • “This is not about intervening in a civil war. It is not about regime change. It is about a limited and targeted strike that does not further escalate tensions in the region and that does everything possible to prevent civilian casualties.”
Emmanuel Macron
  • “The facts and the responsibility of the Syrian regime are not in any doubt. The red line set by France in May 2017 has been crossed.”
  • “Our response has been limited to hitting the capacities of the Syrian regime that permit the production and use of chemical weapons.”
  • “From today, France and its partners will renew their efforts at the United Nations to allow the establishment of an international mechanism to establish responsibility, prevent impunity and prevent any recurrence by the Syrian regime."

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