Sep 7, 2017

Photos: Hurricane Irma makes landfall

Hurricane Irma hit the Caribbean coast yesterday with winds up to 185 mph. It's one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded, and there have been several confirmed fatalities so far. These photos show some of the initial damage of the Category 5 hurricane, which is predicted to be even worse than Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

People make their own sandbags to protect in their homes before the arrival of Hurricane Irma in Las Terrenas, Dominican Republic, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017.AP/Tatiana Fernandez
A man surveys the wreckage on his property after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017.AP/Johnny Jno-Baptiste
A man drives through rain and strong winds during the passage of hurricane Irma, in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017.AP/Carlos Giusti
Rescue staff from the Municipal Emergency Management Agency investigate an empty flooded during the passage of Hurricane Irma through the northeastern part of the island in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017.AP/Carlos Giusti
A woman pushes out floodwaters on her property after the passing of Hurricane Irma, in St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda, Wednesday, Sept. 6, 2017.AP/Johnny Jno-Baptiste
Hurricane Irma approaches Samana, Dominican Republic, Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017.AP/Tatiana Fernandez

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