Jul 6, 2019

In photos: California's historic earthquakes, less than two days apart

Firefighters the morning after the 7.1 magnitude earthquake struck near Ridgecrest, California July 6. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Two of the largest earthquakes to hit California in the past two decades took place less than two days apart this week.

The impact: No fatalities or injuries have been reported for either earthquake — but the latest 7.1 quake caused "multiple structure fires, thousands of power outages, road ruptures and water and gas leaks," per WashPost.

Firefighters battle an electrical fire in a mobile home park in Ridgecrest, California following the magnitude 7.1 quake. Photo: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images
A local resident inspects a fissure in the earth after the 6.4 magnitude quake struck on July 4, 2019. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images
A Minit Gas Station and store on Ridgecrest Blvd. hit by both earthquakes. Photo: Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Evacuated Ridgecrest Regional Hospital patients rest under a tent after the 6.4 magnitude quake. Photo: Irfan Khan/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
Two brothers, an 8- and 5-year-old, sleep in the back of their mothers car in a fire station parking lot after their home was damaged in the 7.1 magnitude quake. Photo: Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
A CERT (certified emergency response team) member walks with a resident through the rubble of her home, damaged after the 7.1 magnitude quake. Photo: Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
A woman and her husband in their front yard after the 7.1 magnitude quake. Photo: Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images
A home after the 6.4-magnitude quake. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
An employee works at Eastridge Market, which has remained open since the 7.1 magnitude quake in an effort to serve the community. Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images
A man and his dog the morning after the 7.1 magnitude quake. Photo: Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

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