Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

People of color now comprise a majority of new hires for the first time in U.S. history, according to the Washington Post's analysis of Labor Department data dating back to 1970.

Why it matters: Minority hires overtook white hires last year, a sign of the shifting demographics of the country's workforce. It means that minority families, who on average earn less and are less wealthy than whites, are gaining more financial security.

By the numbers: Minorities in their prime working age (25 to 54) have gained at least 4.5 million new jobs since 2016, while the same can be said for only 700,000 white workers.

  • The milestone is the result of more baby boomers retiring and more minority women entering the workforce, per the Post.

Yes, but: It is unclear whether minority groups will hold on to these new jobs if job growth slows and the economy slides into a recession.

  • Marianne Wanamaker, an economist and former member of Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers, told the Post: "We’ve seen a lot of gains in employment among lower-income and lower-education groups. But it is precisely those groups that are vulnerable to layoffs if economic activity slows."

Go deeper: Black people are jumping back faster into the workforce

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Amy Harder, author of Generate
11 mins ago - Science

Pandemic scrambles Americans' acceptance of science

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The pandemic is throwing a wrench into Americans' understanding of science, which has big implications for climate change.

Driving the news: Recent focus groups in battleground states suggest some voters are more skeptical of scientists in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, while surveys reveal the persistence of a deep partisan divide.

Spotify has a Joe Rogan dilemma

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Spotify is getting slammed for allowing Joe Rogan, one of its most popular podcasters, to host far-right conspiracy theorist Alex Jones on his show.

Why it matters: The company, which still distributes mostly music, will begin to encounter more of these types of problems as it expands its podcast business.

Coronavirus cases are at an all-time high ahead of Election Day

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Data: The COVID Tracking Project, state health departments; Map: Andrew Witherspoon, Sara Wise/Axios

In the final week before Election Day, new coronavirus infections have soared to an all-time high — virtually guaranteeing that the pandemic will be the most prominent issue in America as voters prepare to choose the next president.

The big picture: Cases are surging and local hospitals are straining at the very moment that voters are choosing between President Trump, who continues to insist that the pandemic is almost over, and Joe Biden, who has made the crisis a centerpiece of his campaign.