Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

People of color now comprise a majority of new hires for the first time in U.S. history, according to the Washington Post's analysis of Labor Department data dating back to 1970.

Why it matters: Minority hires overtook white hires last year, a sign of the shifting demographics of the country's workforce. It means that minority families, who on average earn less and are less wealthy than whites, are gaining more financial security.

By the numbers: Minorities in their prime working age (25 to 54) have gained at least 4.5 million new jobs since 2016, while the same can be said for only 700,000 white workers.

  • The milestone is the result of more baby boomers retiring and more minority women entering the workforce, per the Post.

Yes, but: It is unclear whether minority groups will hold on to these new jobs if job growth slows and the economy slides into a recession.

  • Marianne Wanamaker, an economist and former member of Trump’s Council of Economic Advisers, told the Post: "We’ve seen a lot of gains in employment among lower-income and lower-education groups. But it is precisely those groups that are vulnerable to layoffs if economic activity slows."

Go deeper: Black people are jumping back faster into the workforce

Go deeper

Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Roger Stone arriving at his sentencing hearing on Feb. 20. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, according to two senior administration officials. Stone in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

Why it matters: The controversial move brings an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars. He had been scheduled to report to prison on July 14.

Updated 8 hours ago - Health

Which states have set single-day coronavirus records this week

Data: COVID Tracking Project and state health department data compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti and Naema Ahmed/Axios

13 states this week surpassed records set just last week for their highest number of coronavirus infections in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project and state health department data. 16 states in total reported new highs.

The big picture: The United States' alarming rise in coronavirus cases isn't just due to increased testing — particularly where the number of cases has grown fastest over the last month, Axios' Andrew Witherspoon and Caitlin Owens report.

Updated 9 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 12,389,660 — Total deaths: 557,279 — Total recoveries — 6,830,596Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 3,169,611 — Total deaths: 133,885 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,856,341Map.
  3. Public health: The reality of the coronavirus bites.
  4. Trade: Trump says he's no longer considering phase-two trade deal with China because the pandemic damaged the two countries' relationship.
  5. 🎧 Podcast: Rural America has its own coronavirus problem.