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People in poverty are struggling to finish college

Students preparing to graduate.
Students graduating at Harvard Business school. Photo: Rick Friedman/rickfriedman.com/Corbis via Getty Images

More students than ever from both rich and poor socioeconomic backgrounds are attending college out of high school, reports the New York Times. However, a new study in the journal Demography reveals that the gap between rich and poor graduates continues to grow wider with only 11.8% of children born in the 1980's from poor backgrounds actually graduating.

Why it matters: Hourly wages for those with Bachelor's degrees has risen over $30 since 2015, according to the study, while those who haven't completed college have an hourly wage below $20 on average.

By the numbers:

  • Wages for people who haven't finished college have decreased by 2% since 2000, per the economic policy institute.
  • Wages for college graduates have increased by 6% in that same timespan.
  • The wealthiest people in the country born in the 1980's have a graduation rate of 60.1%

Go deeper: Many states have cut university funding, causing schools to enroll less poor and middle class students.

Axios 11 hours ago
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Joe Uchill 17 hours ago
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Trump already passed Obama in cyber-crime attribution

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Trump administration is blaming foreign governments for cyber attacks at more than 8 times the rate of its predecessors.

Why it matters: Attributions are accusations that a nation committed a destructive crime on foreign soil. They embarrass governments, cause businesses to be skeptical of international partners, and hang an albatross on international relations. Most important, they demand some form of response from leaders.