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Kit for personal genomics technology company 23AndMe. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

The Defense Department is advising military service members against purchasing popular at-home DNA testing kits because of possible "unintended security consequences and increased risk to the joint force and mission," Yahoo News reported.

Why it matters: Despite protests from the DNA companies, the Pentagon makes the case inaccuracies in DNA and health tests like popular kits from 23andMe and Ancestry could compromise service members' medical readiness compared to the general public.

The Department of Defense: "These [direct-to-consumer] genetic tests are largely unregulated and could pose personal and genetic information and potentially create unintended security consequences and increased risk to the joint force and mission."

  • "Possible inaccuracies pose more risk to DoD military personnel than the public due to Service member requirements to disclose medical information that affects readiness."

The big picture: At home testing kits have grown popular in recent years. Ancestry said in May that 15 million people have used their kits, now the largest consumer DNA network in the world.

  • Still, privacy concerns have arose on these companies collecting troves of genetic data from their customers.

The other side:

  • Ancestry: "Ancestry does not share customer DNA data with insurers, employers, or third-party marketers. Ancestry will also not share customer personal information with law enforcement unless compelled to by valid legal process, such as a court order or search warrant," a spokesperson told ABC.
  • 23andMe: “All of our customers should be assured we take the utmost efforts to protect their privacy, and that the results we provide are highly accurate," a spokesperson told ABC.

Go deeper: Genetic testing may prevent ER visits for kids with Type I diabetes

Go deeper

Updated 2 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Vaccines: Key information about the effective COVID-19 vaccines — Oxford and AstraZeneca's vaccine won't just go to rich countries.
  2. Health: U.S. coronavirus hospitalizations keep breaking recordsWhy we're numb to 250,000 deaths.
  3. World: England to impose stricter regional systemU.S. hotspots far outpacing Europe's — Portugal to ban domestic travel for national holidays.
  4. Economy: The biggest pandemic labor market drags.
  5. Sports: Coronavirus precautions leave college basketball schedule in flux.

Michigan board certifies Biden's win

Poll workers count absentee ballots in Detroit, Michigan on Nov. 4. Photo: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The Michigan Board of State Canvassers certified the state's election results on Monday, making President-elect Joe Biden's win there official and granting him the state's 16 electoral votes.

Why it matters: Republican Party leaders had unsuccessfully appealed to delay the official certification, amid the Trump campaign's failed legal challenges in key swing states.

Biden to nominate Janet Yellen as Treasury secretary

Photo: Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden is preparing to nominate former Fed Chair Janet Yellen as his Treasury Secretary, four people familiar with the matter tell Axios.

Why it matters: Yellen, 74, will bring instant economic celebrity to Biden’s team and, if confirmed, she will not only be the first female Treasury Secretary but also the first person to have held all three economic power positions in the federal government: the chair of Council of Economic Advisers, the chair of Federal Reserve and the Treasury Secretary.