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Kit for personal genomics technology company 23AndMe. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

The Defense Department is advising military service members against purchasing popular at-home DNA testing kits because of possible "unintended security consequences and increased risk to the joint force and mission," Yahoo News reported.

Why it matters: Despite protests from the DNA companies, the Pentagon makes the case inaccuracies in DNA and health tests like popular kits from 23andMe and Ancestry could compromise service members' medical readiness compared to the general public.

The Department of Defense: "These [direct-to-consumer] genetic tests are largely unregulated and could pose personal and genetic information and potentially create unintended security consequences and increased risk to the joint force and mission."

  • "Possible inaccuracies pose more risk to DoD military personnel than the public due to Service member requirements to disclose medical information that affects readiness."

The big picture: At home testing kits have grown popular in recent years. Ancestry said in May that 15 million people have used their kits, now the largest consumer DNA network in the world.

  • Still, privacy concerns have arose on these companies collecting troves of genetic data from their customers.

The other side:

  • Ancestry: "Ancestry does not share customer DNA data with insurers, employers, or third-party marketers. Ancestry will also not share customer personal information with law enforcement unless compelled to by valid legal process, such as a court order or search warrant," a spokesperson told ABC.
  • 23andMe: “All of our customers should be assured we take the utmost efforts to protect their privacy, and that the results we provide are highly accurate," a spokesperson told ABC.

Go deeper: Genetic testing may prevent ER visits for kids with Type I diabetes

Go deeper

Scoop: Border officials project 13,000 child migrants in May

The "El Chaparral" border crossing at Tijuana. Photo: Stringer/Picture Alliance via Getty Images

A Customs and Border Protection staffer told top administration officials Thursday the agency is projecting a peak of 13,000 unaccompanied children crossing the border in May, sources directly familiar with the discussion told Axios.

Why it matters: That projection would exceed the height of the 2019 crisis, which led to the infamous "kids-in-cages" disaster. It also underscores a rapidly escalating crisis for the Biden administration.

4 hours ago - World

U.S. strikes Iran-backed militia facilities in Syria

President Biden at the Pentagon on Feb. 10. Photo: Alex Brandon - Pool/Getty Images

The United States on Thursday carried out an airstrike against facilities in Syria linked to an Iran-backed militia group, the Pentagon announced.

The state of play: The strike, approved by President Biden, comes "in response to recent attacks against American and Coalition personnel in Iraq, and to ongoing threats to those personnel," Pentagon press secretary John Kirby said in a statement.

Senate parliamentarian rules $15 minimum wage cannot be included in relief package

Photo: Al Drago/Getty Images

The Senate parliamentarian ruled Thursday that the provision to increase the minimum wage to $15/hour cannot be included in the broader $1.9 trillion COVID relief package.

Why it matters: It's now very likely that any increase in the minimum wage will need bipartisan support, as the provision cannot be passed with the simple Senate majority that Democrats are aiming to use for President Biden's rescue bill.