Lt. Gen. Kenneth McKenzie said in a press briefing Saturday morning that the Pentagon is not aware of any civilian casualties, and announced that since the strike the U.S. has "not seen any military response from actors within Syria."

Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White added that Friday night's U.S. strikes against Syria "does not represent a change in U.S. policy," and the the U.S. does "not seek conflict in Syria."

The details: McKenzie said 105 missiles were launched against the three targets in cooperation with France and the United Kingdom. He reaffirmed the conclusion announced last night that the designated targets were successfully destroyed.

  • The weapons were delivered from British, French and U.S. air and naval platforms in the Red Sea, Northern Arabian Gulf, and Eastern Mediterranean Sea, McKenzie reported. All weapons hit their targets at "very close" to the designated time on target.

There is "no indication that Russian air defense systems were employed," McKenzie said. However, both White and McKenzie called out Russia for ignoring international chemical warfare law.

  • White added that the Pentagon is "very confident we have crippled Assad's ability to produce" chemical weapons.
  • This strike was two times as large as last year's, per McKenzie.
  • The three words McKenzie used to describe the attack: "Precise, overwhelming, and effective."

What next? White said that "depends on what the Assad regime decides to do.”

Go deeper: The Department of Defense released footage of the strike.

  • The video shows a guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61) firing a Tomahawk land attack missile on April 14, 2018.

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 31,120,980 — Total deaths: 961,656— Total recoveries: 21,287,328Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1:30 p.m. ET: 6,819,651 — Total deaths: 199,606 — Total recoveries: 2,590,671 — Total tests: 95,108,559Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  5. Business: Unemployment concerns are growing.
  6. World: "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.). Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Democrats on Monday released their proposal for short-term legislation to fund the government through December 11.

Why it matters: This is Congress' chief legislative focus before the election. They must pass a continuing resolution (CR) before midnight on Oct. 1 to avoid a government shutdown — something both Hill leaders and the White House have claimed is off the table.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in Capitol's National Statuary Hall

Photo: Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Monday that the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in state in the Capitol's National Statuary Hall on Friday, making Ginsburg the first woman to ever receive the honor.

The state of play: The Supreme Court also announced Monday that Ginsburg will lie in repose on the front steps of the building on Wednesday and Thursday, allowing the public to pay respects to the late justice outside.