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Photo: Luis Sinco/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

The Trump administration is delaying a decision on whether to approve a controversial mine in a sensitive Alaskan ecosystem that faces opposition from President Trump's son, Donald Trump Jr., and other prominent conservatives.

Why it matters, via Axios' Amy Harder: The situation could allow the president to avoid making a definitive statement before Election Day, temporarily appeasing both sides. It's still bad news for the mine developers given Joe Biden has vowed to block the project should he win.

  • In an Aug. 20 letter, released on Monday and first reported by The Hill, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said it will not make a decision on a permit for the project until Pebble Limited Partnership, the company behind Pebble Mine, submits a plan to mitigate "unavoidable adverse impacts to aquatic resources," including in nearby wetlands and streams.
  • Pebble Limited Partnership will have 90 days to submit its mitigation plan, meaning a decision on the project's permit may not be made until after November's election.

The big picture: The large gold and copper mine, if approved, would be located at a prominent sockeye salmon fishery in the Bristol Bay area.

  • The project, which was blocked by the Obama administration, has been opposed by environmentalists and fishing industry groups.
  • Conservatives, including Trump Jr. and Fox News host Tucker Carlson, have also expressed opposition.
  • In issuing its final environmental review report last month, the Army Corps said it would make a decision on whether to issue a permit for the project within 30 days. The report found that the project would not lead to "long-term changes in the health of the commercial fisheries in Bristol Bay."

The other side: In a statement Monday, Pebble Limited Partnership CEO Tom Collier expressed confidence that the project will move forward.

  • "We believe our final Comprehensive Management Plan submission will be submitted within weeks and will satisfy all of the requirements of the letter,” Collier said.
  • "Anyone suggesting a different opinion—i.e. that Pebble will not be able to comply with the letter or that such compliance will significantly delay issuing a [decision]—must be ignorant of the EXTENSIVE preparation we have undertaken in order to meet the requirements of the letter.”
  • "This is the next step in what has been a comprehensive, exhaustive two-and-a-half-year review of the project. Nothing in the letter is a surprise to us or them,” he added, denying reports that pressure from prominent conservative voices played a role in the Army Corps letter.

Go deeper

Updated Nov 23, 2020 - Politics & Policy

Key government agency says Biden transition can formally begin

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy. Photo: Alex Edelman/CNP/Getty Images

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that she has determined the transition from the Trump administration can formally begin.

Why it matters: Murphy, a Trump appointee, had come under fire for delaying the so-called "ascertainment" and withholding the funds and information needed for the transition to begin while Trump's legal challenges played out.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
10 hours ago - Technology

TikTok gets more time (again)

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The White House is again giving TikTok's Chinese parent company more to satisfy national security concerns, rather than initiating legal action, a source familiar with the situation tells Axios.

The state of play: China's ByteDance had until Friday to resolve issues raised by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (CFIUS), which is chaired by Treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin. This was the company's third deadline, with CFIUS having provided two earlier extensions.

Federal judge orders Trump administration to restore DACA

DACA recipients and their supporters rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court on June 18. Photo: Drew Angerer via Getty

A federal judge on Friday ordered the Trump administration to fully restore the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, giving undocumented immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as children a chance to petition for protection from deportation.

Why it matters: DACA was implemented under former President Obama, but President Trump has sought to undo the program since taking office. Friday’s ruling will require Department of Homeland Security officers to begin accepting applications starting Monday and guarantee that work permits are valid for two years.