CFPB director Richard Cordray

The parent company of payday lender Speedy Cash has filed for a $100 million IPO. It plans to trade on the NYSE under ticker symbol CURO, with Credit Suisse listed as left lead underwriter. The Kansas-based company reports $33 million of net income of $442 million of revenue for the first half of 2017, and is owned by private equity firm FFL Partners.

Tricky timing: This filing comes just weeks after the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau issued strict new rules on payday lending, with most provisions slated to become effective in mid-2019. If not overturned by Congress – or rescinded by whoever follows Richard Cordray as CFPB boss – these regulations would eventually eat into both Speedy Cash's top and bottom lines, even if they also prompt industry consolidation.

Ridiculous rates: Per its website, Speedy Cash charges $273.01 in fees on a $500 online installment loan in Nevada (where your humble correspondent is this week, for the Money 20/220 financial tech conference). That works out to a whopping APR of 438.78%, and assumes all payments are made on time over a 77-day period. The APR on an online, 14-day payday loan of $500 in Nevada works out to 651.79%, or total payback of $625. In-store Nevada APR rates are around 460%.

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Amy Harder, author of Generate
5 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Climate change goes mainstream in presidential debate

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty

The most notable part of Thursday’s presidential debate on climate change was the fact it was included as a topic and assumed as a fact.

The big picture: This is the first time in U.S. presidential history that climate change was a featured issue at a debate. It signals how the problem has become part of the fabric of our society. More extreme weather, like the wildfires ravaging Colorado, is pushing the topic to the front-burner.

Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes.

  • A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.

Biden to Trump: "I have not taken a penny from any foreign source ever in my life"

Former VP Joe Biden pushed back Thursday against allegations from President Trump, saying he had never profited from foreign sources. "Nothing was unethical," Biden told debate moderator Kristen Welker about his son Hunter's work in Ukraine while he was vice president.

Why it matters: Earlier on Thursday, Hunter Biden's former business partner, Tony Bobulinski, released a statement saying Joe Biden's claims that he never discussed overseas business dealings with his son were "false."