Matt Rourke / AP

Paul Manafort is Donald Trump's former campaign manager and now the subject of a 12-count indictment that, among other things, accuses him of conspiring against the United States. Oh, and he also seems to have been an Airbnb host in lower Manhattan. Per the indictment (h/t @JenSaidIt):

In 2012, Manafort, though a corporate vehicle called "MC Soho Holdings, LLC," owned by him and his family, bought a condominium on Howard Street in the Soho neighborhood in Manhattan, New York. He paid approximately $2,850,000. All the money used to purchase the condominium came from Manafort entities in Cyprus. Manafort used the property from at least January 2015 through 2016 as an income-generating rental property, charging thousands of dollars a week on Airbnb, among other places.

Context: The indictment goes on to say that Manafort lied about the property being used for rentals — instead he claimed it as a second residence used by his daughter and son-in-law — in order to obtain a larger bank loan than would otherwise be approved.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 32,881,747 — Total deaths: 994,821 — Total recoveries: 22,758,171Map.
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  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
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  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Durbin on Barrett confirmation: "We can’t stop the outcome"

Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) said on ABC's "This Week" Sunday that Senate Democrats can “slow” the process of confirming Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett “perhaps a matter of hours, maybe days at the most," but that they "can’t stop the outcome."

Why it matters: Durbin confirmed that Democrats have "no procedural silver bullet" to stop Senate Republicans from confirming Barrett before the election, especially with only two GOP senators — Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine — voicing their opposition. Instead, Democrats will likely look to retaliate after the election if they win control of the Senate and White House.

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Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge announced in an op-ed Sunday that he would be voting for Joe Biden.

Why it matters: Ridge, who was also the first secretary of homeland security under George W. Bush, joins other prominent Republicans who have publicly said they will either not vote for Trump's re-election this November or will back Biden.