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Newly released Gallup polling shows a widening partisan split on climate change and a growing rejection among Republicans of the dominant scientific views on the topic.

Why it matters: The polling underscores why, despite rare bipartisan policy agreements, prospects for sweeping legislative action on climate change are as remote as ever. The data arrives as the White House is unwinding several Obama-era global warming initiatives.

Expand chart
Data: Gallup. Note: Survey conducted March 1-8; Chart: Axios Visuals

What they found (Check out the chart above): The nationwide telephone poll of slightly over 1,000 adults in early March shows that almost nine in 10 Democrats agree that global warming is caused by humans, compared to roughly a third of Republicans.

  • The scientific consensus is that human activities, notably the burning of fossil fuels, have been the dominant driver of warming since the mid-20th century.

Yes, but: Overall public belief in human-caused climate change; concern about the topic; and agreement that its effects are already apparent has generally risen in recent years, even though it dipped from 2017 to 2018.

Expand chart
Data: Gallup. Note: Survey conducted annually in March; Chart: Axios Visuals

What they're saying: "The higher level of concern Americans have exhibited about global warming since 2016, particularly in terms of worrying about the issue and believing it is caused by human activity, is largely intact this year," Gallup analysts said in a summary of the data.

  • "One reason for this stability is that Americans' views on the issue are becoming increasingly partisan and therefore entrenched. With Trump reversing many of his predecessors' policies aimed at curbing global warming, Democrats are feeling a greater sense of urgency about the issue, while Republicans have either remained as skeptical as they had been in the past or have become more so," Gallup added.

Go deeper

Rideshare companies say driver shortage is pushing prices up

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It's not just you: Uber and Lyft rides are more expensive, company executives said this week.

Why it matters: Demand for rideshare is roaring back as the economy starts to reopen, but the same can't be said for drivers on the apps. That means fewer cars on the road, causing a supply gap that's pushing up prices.

Pelosi slams GOP leadership's moves against Liz Cheney

U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Photo: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this week condemned Republican efforts to oust Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) as House GOP conference chair.

Why it matters: A number of Democrats have spoken out against attempts to punish Cheney for her criticism of former President Trump, framing the discussion as one essential to the maintenance of American democracy.

What to watch in AMLO's meeting with Harris

Three Mexico national guardsmen stand in front of the metro overpass that collapsed onto a busy highway. Photo: Julián Lopez/ Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Joint efforts to stem the increased number of migrants heading to the U.S. will likely be at the top of discussions when Vice President Kamala Harris and Mexico President Andrés Manuel López Obrador hold their virtual meeting on Friday.

The big picture: The U.S. government has consistently asked its southern neighbor to prevent immigrants from reaching the border, mostly through threats like former President Trump’s talk of tariffs.

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