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On the eve of the One Planet Summit he is hosting in Paris today with the World Bank and United Nations, French President Emmanuel Macron told CBS News that Trump's move to abandon the Paris climate deal was a mistake, but one that has "counter-momentum" in favor of curbing emissions.

Trump's move was "a deep wakeup call for the private sectors and some of us to say, 'Wow, so we have to react.' If we decide not to move and not change our way to produce, to invest, to behave, we will be responsible for billions of victims." — French President Emmanuel Macron

The event, to which Trump was not invited, features a range of new commitments and pledges.

Yes, but: Back in Washington, E&E News reports on White House plans to promote U.S. coal exports and more efficient use of coal in other countries reliant on the fuel.

White House international energy aide George David Banks is leading the "Clean Coal Alliance," which also includes natural gas exports, E&E News says. Per E&E News:

  • Formal outreach to other countries hasn't begun, the Trump administration is expected to invite big coal exporters and importers like Australia, Indonesia, China, India, Ukraine, Poland, and Japan and others.
  • An administration official said, "The U.S. is considering pulling together a group of countries that support using cleaner, more efficient fossil fuels," and the story notes that Banks talked about the effort in a meeting last week with lawmakers and companies including Peabody Energy, FirstEnergy and Arch Coal.

Our thought bubble: The move highlights the contradictory nature of the White House posture on climate — what my colleague Amy Harder calls "Trump's conflicting climate agenda" in this column.

Officials at the highest levels of the Trump administration dispute the scientific consensus that human activities have been the primary driver of global warming for over a half century. But amid the skepticism, a global policy stance of sorts has emerged in international meetings including the recent UN talks in Bonn.

It's one that favors fossil fuels (with a nod to nuclear power too). It justifies the stance by arguing that surging global energy demand dictates that top priorities should be using coal more efficiently, promoting carbon capture development, and natural gas.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - World

World leaders react to "new dawn in America" under Biden administration

President Biden reacts delivers his inaugural address on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

World leaders have pledged to work with President Biden on issues including the COVID-19 pandemic and climate change, with many praising his move to begin the formal process for the U.S. to rejoin the Paris Climate Agreement.

The big picture: Several leaders noted the swift shift from former President Trump's "America First" policy to Biden's action to re-engage with the world and rebuild alliances.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

President Biden and first lady Jill Biden watch a fireworks show on the National Mall from the Truman Balcony at the White House on Wednesday night. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Biden signed his first executive orders into law from the Oval Office on Wednesday evening after walking in a brief inaugural parade to the White House with first lady Jill Biden and members of their family. He was inaugurated with Vice President Kamala Harris at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Many of Biden's day one actions immediately reverse key Trump administration policies, including rejoining the Paris Agreement and the World Health Organization, launching a racial equity initiative and reversing the Muslim travel ban.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.