Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!
Expand chart
Data: American Petroleum Institute; Cartogram: Chris Canipe / Axios

Nearly half of all U.S. states have raised their gasoline taxes since 2013, according to industry data compiled by Axios.

Why it matters: The trend, which includes conservative states, stands in stark contrast to the opposition that congressional Republicans and conservative interest groups have to raising the federal gas tax. President Trump has endorsed the idea of raising it to help fund his administration’s infrastructure proposal. The tax, which Congress hasn’t raised in 25 years, stands at 18.4 cents per gallon.

What’s next: A battle between two corners of Republican Party

  • The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is pushing a 25 cent gas tax hike as part of the broader infrastructure overhaul plan it’s pitching to Congress.
  • Conservative groups led by Americans for Prosperity are fighting it. The head of that group, Tim Phillips, told Axios recently this is a top issue for the them and they’re considering running campaigns against conservatives who support such a policy.

Quoted: Phillips noted that his group succeeded in fighting off proposals to raise gas taxes in South Carolina and Tennessee for multiple years before ultimately losing. As the saying goes, it only takes one.

“You’ve seen some deep red states, Republican states pass gas taxes and we fought to the very end in each of those states.”
— Tim Phillips, president, Americans for Prosperity

Our prediction: The Chamber’s proposal, despite an apparent endorsement by Trump, faces steep odds in this Congress. Many Republicans are opposed to the notion that Washington would raise taxes shortly after passing tax cuts. But both sides of this battle view the Chamber’s proposal as the beginning of a years’ long fight.

Go deeper: White House aide urges broader debate on gas tax

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.