Updated Feb 27, 2018

The 23 U.S. states that have hiked gas taxes since 2013

Data: American Petroleum Institute; Cartogram: Chris Canipe / Axios

Nearly half of all U.S. states have raised their gasoline taxes since 2013, according to industry data compiled by Axios.

Why it matters: The trend, which includes conservative states, stands in stark contrast to the opposition that congressional Republicans and conservative interest groups have to raising the federal gas tax. President Trump has endorsed the idea of raising it to help fund his administration’s infrastructure proposal. The tax, which Congress hasn’t raised in 25 years, stands at 18.4 cents per gallon.

What’s next: A battle between two corners of Republican Party

  • The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is pushing a 25 cent gas tax hike as part of the broader infrastructure overhaul plan it’s pitching to Congress.
  • Conservative groups led by Americans for Prosperity are fighting it. The head of that group, Tim Phillips, told Axios recently this is a top issue for the them and they’re considering running campaigns against conservatives who support such a policy.

Quoted: Phillips noted that his group succeeded in fighting off proposals to raise gas taxes in South Carolina and Tennessee for multiple years before ultimately losing. As the saying goes, it only takes one.

“You’ve seen some deep red states, Republican states pass gas taxes and we fought to the very end in each of those states.”
— Tim Phillips, president, Americans for Prosperity

Our prediction: The Chamber’s proposal, despite an apparent endorsement by Trump, faces steep odds in this Congress. Many Republicans are opposed to the notion that Washington would raise taxes shortly after passing tax cuts. But both sides of this battle view the Chamber’s proposal as the beginning of a years’ long fight.

Go deeper: White House aide urges broader debate on gas tax

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Exclusive: Chamber of Commerce CEO to push a more bipartisan agenda

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photo: Eric Piermont/Getty Images

Tom Donohue, the longtime CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, will deliver a speech Thursday urging bipartisan support for issues that Democrats hold dear — like climate change and infrastructure investment, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The Chamber is the largest business organization in the U.S., and some of Donohue's remarks will be a departure for a group that has, under his leadership, "battled environmental regulations, restrictions on cigarette packaging, workplace antidiscrimination rules and minimum-wage requirements," as WSJ put it.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020

New York City's mansion tax impacts housing cost

Manhattan sunset, seen in September from Arthur Ashe Stadium in Queens, home of the U.S. Open. Photo: TPN/Getty Images

The average price of a Manhattan co-op or condo fell to $1.8 million in the fourth quarter of 2019, according to Douglass Elliman, the largest real estate brokerage in the New York City area, the Financial Times reports.

Why it matters: "The Manhattan property drop is in sharp contrast to the rally on Wall Street, where stock markets have hit new records."

Go deeperArrowJan 4, 2020

The decade that blew up energy predictions

Illustration: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

America’s energy sources, like booming oil and crumbling coal, have defied projections and historical precedents over the last decade.

Why it matters: It shows how change can happen rapidly and unexpectedly, even in an industry known to move gradually and predictably. With a new decade upon us, let’s look back at the last one’s biggest, most surprising energy changes.

Go deeperArrowDec 23, 2019