Updated Mar 13, 2018

Occidental latest oil producer to issue climate report

Amy Harder, author of Generate

Occidental Petroleum, one of the biggest producers in Texas’ Permian basin, quietly issued its first-ever climate change report earlier this month.

Why it matters: Occidental’s report is the latest from a string of fossil-fuel companies responding to resolutions pushed last year by investors requiring more disclosure about what companies are doing to prepare for a carbon-constrained future. Occidental stood out last year because its measure was both the first to pass and saw record votes in support.

Gritty details:

  • Much of the report is devoted to explaining how its decades-long practice of using carbon to extract oil will help it cut carbon emissions. Occidental mostly uses naturally occurring carbon, but the company anticipates using more human-captured carbon with the passage of tax credits incentivizing carbon-capture technologies.
  • It also finds that its oil resources won’t be impacted in a world that sees carbon emissions reduced to a level consistent with keeping Earth’s temperature from rising two degrees Celsius, a common benchmark in these shareholder resolutions that also is driving the 2015 Paris climate deal.

What we’re hearing:

“Importantly, the company has coupled the release of this report to a number of forward-looking commitments, including regularly re-evaluating its climate strategy with board oversight, using more rigorous scenarios, and embedding a carbon cost in the capital allocation process.”
— Andrew Logan, director of oil and gas, Ceres

Go deeper

Barr claims "no correlation" between removing protesters and Trump's church photo op

Attorney General Bill Barr said at a press conference Thursday that there was "no correlation" between his decision to order police to forcibly remove protesters from Lafayette Park and President Trump's subsequent visit to St. John's Episcopal Church earlier this week.

Driving the news: Barr was asked to respond to comments from Defense Secretary Mark Esper, who said Tuesday that he "did not know a photo op was happening" and that he does everything he can to "try and stay out of situations that may appear political."

Updates: Cities move to end curfews for George Floyd protests

Text reading "Demilitarize the police" is projected on an army vehicle during a protest over the death of George Floyd in Washington, D.C.. early on Thursday. Photo: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Several cities are ending curfews after the protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people led to fewer arrests and less violence Wednesday night.

The latest: Los Angeles and Washington D.C. are the latest to end nightly curfews. Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan tweeted Wednesday night that "peaceful protests can continue without a curfew, while San Francisco Mayor London Breed tweeted that the city's curfew would end at 5 a.m. Thursday.

Murkowski calls Mattis' Trump criticism "true and honest and necessary and overdue"

Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said Thursday that she agreed with former Defense Secretary James Mattis' criticism of President Trump, calling it "true and honest and necessary and overdue."

Why it matters: Murkowski, who has signaled her discomfort with the president in the past, also said that she's "struggling" with her support for him in November — a rare full-on rebuke of Trump from a Senate Republican.