Apr 25, 2018

Nikki Haley's approval numbers were unheard of

Haley at the UN. Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty

UN Ambassador Nikki Haley is the most popular member of President Trump's foreign policy team, surpassing Defense Secretary Mattis, and she even has widespread approval among Democrats, young people and minorities, according to a new Quinnipiac poll.

Why it matters: The former governor of South Carolina is just 46 years old, and her political ambitions extend far beyond her current post. Most senior officials in this administration have become polarizing just by virtue of working for Trump, but not Haley — at least so far.

By the numbers
  • Haley's approval/disapproval: Republicans (75/9), Democrats (55/23), Independents (63/19).
  • Compare that to Trump: Republicans (84/11), Democrats (5/92), Independents (34/58).
  • Black and Hispanic voters were more than twice as likely to approve of Haley than Trump, and women nearly so.

Worth noting: Foreign policy roles are often a good way to stay above the political fray —Hillary Clinton, for example, was quite popular as secretary of state. Still, Haley stands out when compared to the likes of Mike Pompeo and John Bolton.

The backdrop: This poll was conducted days after a high-profile spat between Haley and the White House on Russia sanctions. Haley's retort — "with all due respect, I don't get confused" — made headlines. According to the NY Times, Trump has been frustrated by her public statements on more than one occasion, particularly when it comes to Russia.

Go deeper

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 855,007 — Total deaths: 42,032 — Total recoveries: 176,714.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in confirmed cases. Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 186,265 — Total deaths: 3,810 — Total recoveries: 6,910.
  3. Business updates: Should you pay your rent or mortgage during the coronavirus pandemic? Find out if you are protected under the CARES Act.
  4. Public health updates: More than 400 long-term care facilities across the U.S. report patients with coronavirus — Older adults and people with underlying health conditions are more at risk, new data shows.
  5. Federal government latest: President Trump said the next two weeks would be "very painful" on Tuesday, with projections indicating the virus could kill 100,000–240,000 Americans. The White House and other institutions are observing several models to help prepare for when COVID-19 is expected to peak in the U.S.
  6. U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt: Captain of nuclear aircraft carrier docked in Guam pleaded with the U.S. Navy for more resources after more than 100 members of his crew tested positive.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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