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Voters cast their ballots during the 2018 midterm election in New York. Photo: Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

New York's Democratic-controlled state legislature on Monday swiftly passed a slew of electoral reform measures that will roll back some of the state’s arcane voting laws and increase access to the ballot box.

Why it matters: New York purports itself as the country's progressive capital. But it has some of the nation's most restrictive voting laws, which depress voter turnout and routinely rank the state among those with the lowest turnout rates.

The sweeping package of voting bills, which Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) is expected to sign into law, will put the state on par with others, including some red states that have enacted similar reforms in recent years.

The measures passed on Monday would:

  • Designate an early voting period 10 days before Election Day.
  • Consolidate election primary dates. Last year, it was the only state that held separate federal and state primary elections.
  • Automatically update voter registrations when residents move.
  • Allow 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote.

Lawmakers also started the process of amending the state constitution to allow same-day voter registration and no-excuse absentee voting by mail.

Between the lines: This comes as Democrats, who took control of the state Senate in last year's midterm for the first time in a decade, assume full control of both legislative chambers and the governor’s seat. For years, Democrats have failed push through their priorities amid GOP opposition .

Go deeper:

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DOJ: Capitol rioter threatened to "assassinate" Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Supporters of former President Trump storm the U.S. Captiol on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A Texas man who has be charged with storming the U.S. Capitol in the deadly Jan. 6 siege posted death threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Department of Justice said.

The big picture: Garret Miller faces five charges in connection to the riot by supporters of former President Trump, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and making threats. According to court documents, Miller posted violent threats online the day of the siege, including tweeting “Assassinate AOC.”

Schumer calls for IG probe into alleged plan by Trump, DOJ lawyer to oust acting AG

Jeffrey Clark speaks next to Deputy US Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen at a news conference in October. Photo: Yuri Gripas/AFP via Getty Images.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) on Saturday called for the Justice Department inspector general to investigate an alleged plan by former President Trump and a DOJ lawyer to remove the acting attorney general and replace him with someone more willing to investigate unfounded claims of election fraud.

Driving the news: The New York Times first reported Friday that the lawyer, Jeffrey Clark, allegedly devised "ways to cast doubt on the election results and to bolster Mr. Trump’s continuing legal battles and the pressure on Georgia politicians. Because Mr. [Jeffrey] Rosen had refused the president’s entreaties to carry out those plans, Mr. Trump was about to decide whether to fire Mr. Rosen and replace him with Mr. Clark."

4 hours ago - World

Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine

Containers carrying doses of the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine arrive in Brazil. Photo: Maurio Pimentel/AFP via Getty Images

Brazil on Saturday began distributing the 2 million doses of the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine that arrived from India Friday, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: Brazil has the third highest COVID-19 case-count in the world, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The 2 million doses "only scratch the surface of the shortfall," Brazilian public health experts told the AP.