Photo: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

A project receiving funding from the Koch network aims to help inmates "successfully reintegrate into society," the Washington Post reports.

The details: Dubbed Safe Streets and Second Chances, the project centers around researchers monitoring 1,100 prisoners across four states — Kentucky, Pennsylvania, Florida and Texas — after they are released. The network has been working to overhaul the criminal justice system, and prioritize rehabilitation instead of punishment.

Researchers hope to gain insight from monitoring the released prisoners as they test new ways to help prisoners find "healthy coping and thinking patterns," job opportunities and social engagement, the Post reports.

  • A Koch network donor on the advisory council for the project, Doug Deason, told the Post that the goal is to "prepare prisoners to reenter society and become productive members and taxpaying citizens, hopefully living productive lives and taking care of their families."

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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What's next for Lebanon after the Beirut explosion

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Beirut residents are still clearing rubble from streets that appear war-torn, days after a blast that shocked the country and horrified the world.

Why it matters: The explosion is likely to accelerate a painful cycle Lebanon was already living through — discontent, economic distress, and emigration.

Wolf Blitzer marks 15 years in "The Situation Room"

Wolf Blitzer on the White House beat in 1993, along with NBC's Brian Williams, CBS' Rita Braver and ABC's Brit Hume. Photo: Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images H

Aug. 8, 2005 — "The Situation Room's" debut on CNN wherein the host first said: "I'm Wolf Blitzer and you're in The Situation Room, where news and information from around the world arrive in one place simultaneously!"

The state of play: When the pandemic took off in the U.S. in March, Blitzer started working 7 days a week for 60+ days, until he took a Sunday off. Then he continued 7 days a week until he took a few days off.