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The National Labor Relations Board has issued a complaint against Tesla following allegations that it was intimidating employees who wanted to unionize. This follows four charges filed in February by the United Automobile Workers against Tesla for allegedly surveilling and coercing workers who attempted to distribute information about the union drive.

Details: According to the NLRB's complaint, obtained by Buzzfeed, Tesla security guards asked those workers to produce IDs and to leave the premises. It also mentions Tesla's policy prohibiting workers from discussing their work environment with the media, sharing photos on social media, and forwarding work emails to a personal account.

Tesla dismisses the allegations as baseless. A hearing in front of a NLRB administrative judge is scheduled for Nov. 14.

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TikTok caught in a U.S.-China vise

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

TikTok, the short-video platform popular among teens for sharing funny moments and dance moves, is getting pulled into the deadly serious geopolitical conflict between China and the U.S.

The big picture: More than any other Chinese-owned app, TikTok has found success outside of its homeland. But as the U.S. sounds security alarms and China turns the legal screws on Hong Kong, the company is fighting to prove that it's not beholden to Beijing — and to forestall a threatened ban by the Trump administration.

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Wednesday was the worst day in college sports since March 12, when the coronavirus pandemic shut everything down.

Driving the news: The Ivy League announced that it will cancel all fall sports and will not consider resuming sports until Jan. 1, 2021 — and Stanford is permanently cutting 11 of its 36 varsity sports to help offset a projected $70 million, pandemic-fueled deficit.

1.3 million Americans filed for unemployment last week

Data: U.S. Employment and Training Administration via FRED; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Another 1.3 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week, the Labor Department said Thursday.

Why it matters: The number of new unemployment applications has fallen steadily since peaking in March, but the number is still historically higher than before the pandemic hit. Economists are watching the weekly gauge for any sign that spiking unemployment may come alongside the sharp uptick in coronavirus cases around the country.