Jan 23, 2018

Mosul, after ISIS

An Iraqi man walks over the rubble in the old city of Mosul. Photo: AHMAD AL-RUBAYE / AFP / Getty Images

In December, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi proclaimed the end of the nearly four-year-long war against ISIS, five months after al-Abadi announced victory in the city of Mosul.

Why it matters: Since Iraq's second-largest city was liberated, around 327,000 of the 1 million people who left the city have returned, ABC reports. And while the people of Mosul are beginning their lives again, after three years of ISIS control the conditions of the city still pose challenges and dangers to its residents.

Mosul, after ISIS
  • Lise Grande, the U.N. Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq, said in a statement that eastern and western Mosul are facing different challenges: "Ninety-seven percent of the population has returned to their homes in eastern Mosul. People are rebuilding their lives there...Conditions in western Mosul are very difficult...Families are worried about booby-traps, security and services."
  • More than 270,000 people were "living in 18 camps and emergency sites surrounding the city," per a U.N. report from October.
  • ABC reports that repairing the basic infrastructure in the city will cost more than an estimated $1 billion.
  • Corruption in the Iraqi government has led citizens to doubt claims that "hundreds of millions of dollars of U.N. aid is being spent to rebuild Mosul," CNN reports.
  • As of October, the remains of 1,642 civilians had been found underneath rubble, the U.N. reported.
  • 60,000 homes are "uninhabitable," the New York Times reports, and "at least 20,000 commercial and government buildings" were destroyed.

Go deeper: Timeline: the rise and fall of ISIS in Iraq and Syria

Go deeper

Updated 17 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

Updated 38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

U.S. cities crack down on protesters

Demonstrators gather at Lafayette Park across from the White House to protest the death of George Floyd in Washington, D.C. Photo: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Major U.S. cities have implemented curfews and called on National Guard to mobilize as thousands of demonstrators gather across the nation to continue protesting the death of George Floyd.

The state of play: Hundreds have already been arrested as tensions continue to rise between protesters and local governments. Protesters are setting police cars on fire as freeways remain blocked and windows are shattered, per the Washington Post. Law enforcement officials are using tear gas and rubber bullets to try to disperse crowds and send protesters home.

Trump to invite Russia and other non-member G7 countries to summit

President Trump at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Saturday. Photo: Saul Martinez/Getty Images

President Trump told reporters on Saturday evening he would postpone the G7 summit to September and expand the meeting to more nations that are not members of the Group of 7.

Details: Trump said he would invite Russia, South Korea, Australia and India to the summit, according to a pool report. "I don’t feel that as a G7 it properly represents what’s going on in the world. It’s a very outdated group of countries," he said.