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Monia Lewinsky and President Bill Clinton. Photo: Getty Images

Monica Lewinsky, speaking in detail about her affair with former President Bill Clinton for the first time in a new documentary from A&E called "The Clinton Affair," , said that, when she was being interviewed by the FBI in its aftermath, she felt "the only way to fix this was to kill [herself]," per an exclusive clip aired on ABC's "Good Morning America."

The big picture: While this is the first detailed account of the affair that Lewinsky has given, she been part of the #MeToo era conversation in the last year after Clinton said he did "the right thing" during the scandal and Hillary Clinton defended her husband's decisions at the time. Lewinsky wrote in Vanity Fair that she chose to partake in the documentary because "[a]n important part of moving forward is excavating, often painfully, what has gone before."

During the impeachment hearings, Lewinsky said that she "still was in love with Bill at the time" and felt "really responsible."

  • On the first time Clinton noticed her: "He paid a lot of attention to me. He spent time sort of standing there and held my hand longer than he should have, and gave what others have described as the full Bill Clinton — it feels as if you're the only person standing there."
  • Of the affair, she explained: "It's not as if it didn't register with me that he was the president...but I think in one way, the moment we were actually in the back office for the first time, the truth is is that I think it meant more to me that someone who other people desired, desired me. However wrong it was, however misguided, for who I was in that very moment at 22 years old, that was how it felt."

By doing the documentary, she hopes to "ensure that what happened to [her] never happens to another young person in our country again," according to her piece in Vanity Fair.

Watch the video, via "Good Morning America":

A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

Go deeper

Cuomo says words may have been "misinterpreted" following allegations of harassment

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo at a Feb. 22 news conference. Photo: Seth Wenig/pool/AF via Getty Images

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued a lengthy statement on Sunday saying he " never inappropriately touched anybody" but acknowledged that "some of the things I have said have been misinterpreted as an unwanted flirtation," after two of his former aides accused him of sexual harassment.

Why it matters: Prior to Cuomo's statement, in which he adds that he "never inappropriately touched anybody" or meant to make anyone uncomfortable, the governor's office and the state attorney general went back and forth in a public disagreement about how to investigate the allegations.

Cyber CEO: Next war will hit regular Americans online

Any future real-world conflict between the United States and an adversary like China or Russia will have direct impacts on regular Americans because of the risk of cyber attack, Kevin Mandia, CEO of cybersecurity company FireEye, tells "Axios on HBO."

What they're saying: "The next conflict where the gloves come off in cyber, the American citizen will be dragged into it, whether they want to be or not. Period."

Cedric Richmond: We won't wait on GOP for "insufficient" stimulus

Top Biden adviser Cedric Richmond told "Axios on HBO" the White House believes it has bipartisan support for a stimulus bill outside the Beltway.

  • "If our choice is to wait and go bipartisan with an insufficient package, we are not going to do that."

The big picture: The bill will likely undergo an overhaul in the Senate after House Democrats narrowly passed a stimulus bill this weekend, reports Axios' Kadia Goba.

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