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Mnuchin requested government jet for honeymoon

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, left, and his wife, Scottish actress Louise Linton, right, and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, second from left, and his wife Hilary Geary, second from right, wait for President Donald Trump. Photo: Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin requested a government jet earlier this year for his honeymoon, according to ABC News. That unusual request prompted the Treasury Department's Office of Inspector General to launch an inquiry.

His trips on a government jet to Louisville and Fort Knox are also being reviewed based on suspicions that he used the jet to watch the eclipse. Mnuchin's office denied those claims, and says he took the trip for meetings on tax reform.

A spokesman for the Treasury Department said Mnuchin requested the government jet for his honeymoon to make sure he had a secure method of communication — he's a member of the National Security Council — and used other travel methods after realizing there are other secure ways to communicate.

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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Stef Kight / Axios

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 8 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the NYT. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.