Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin met Monday with Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman (MBS) in Riyadh, the day before the controversial Saudi Future Investment Initiative conference.

Why it matters: Despite joining several other high-profile media companies and individuals in pulling out of FII, colloquially known as "Davos in the Desert," over the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, the meeting shows both Mnuchin's and the Trump administration's efforts to continue working with MBS despite global outcry over Khashoggi. Mnuchin's spokesman, Tony Sayegh, tweeted Monday that during the meeting the two "addressed combating terrorist financing, implementing Iran sanctions, Saudi economic issues and the Khashoggi investigation."

Go deeper

Updated 20 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 33,156,812 — Total deaths: 998,696 — Total recoveries: 22,961,436Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 7,118,523 — Total deaths: 204,790 — Total recoveries: 2,766,280 — Total tests: 101,298,794Map.
  3. Business: Companies are still holding back earnings guidance.
  4. Health: The childless vaccine — Why kids get less severe coronavirus infections.
  5. World: India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases

Facebook's latest headache: Its own employees' posts

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook’s rules for what people can say on the world’s largest social network have been a long-term headache for the company, but now it faces similar troubles on the internal network its own staff uses.

Driving the news: As political arguments on Facebook’s employee discussion boards have grown more heated and divisive, the company ordered new restrictions on the forums earlier this month, which run on Facebook’s Workplace platform.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
3 hours ago - Energy & Environment

How a conservative Supreme Court would impact climate policy

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Amy Coney Barrett's likely ascension to the Supreme Court would affect climate policy beyond shoving the court rightward in the abstract.

Why it matters: If Joe Biden wins the presidential election, his regulations and potential new climate laws would face litigation that could reach the high court.