Oct 9, 2018

Millennials are ditching primary care doctors

Photo: Brooks Kraft LLC/Corbis via Getty Images

First they came for chain restaurants, then golf, and now millennials are turning their backs on another old institution: primary care. Younger patients are increasingly turning away from primary care doctors and toward clinics or urgent care centers, the Washington Post reports.

By the numbers: In a Kaiser Family Foundation poll, 45% of 18- to 29-year-olds didn't have a primary care provider. That number was significantly lower for older respondents.

Waiting several days for an appointment when you're sick is not super attractive to young people.

  • “These trends are more evident among millennials, but not unique to them. I think people’s expectations have changed," Harvard professor Ateev Mehrotra told the Post.
  • "Now people say, ‘That’s crazy, why would I wait that long?’" Mehrotra said.

Theoretically, primary care providers are supposed to be the people at the center of our care, keeping tabs on patients' health and helping to coordinate our various needs.

  • But if you're only using the health care system when something's acutely wrong, a walk-in clinic might seem more logical — and it's certainly more affordable than the emergency room, which used to fill those after-hours needs.

Yes, but: The care may not be as good.

  • In a recent study, almost half the people treated for a simple cold or flu at an urgent care clinic "left with an unnecessary and potentially harmful prescription for antibiotics," compared with just 17% of those treated by a primary care doctor, per the Post.

Go deeper

FBI to investigate death of black man after video shows officer kneeling on neck

A man protesting near the area where a Minneapolis Police Department officer allegedly killed George Floyd. Photo: Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images

The FBI will investigate the death of a black man for possible civil rights violations after video emerged of a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on the man's neck for several minutes, ignoring protests that he couldn't breathe, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reports.

The big picture: The man, identified as George Floyd, was being arrested for alleged forgery and appeared to be under the influence of alcohol or drugs, according to a police press conference Monday night. Police say he resisted arrest before suffering from “medical distress."

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 5,543,439 — Total deaths: 347,836 — Total recoveries — 2,266,394Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 1,669,040 — Total deaths: 98,426 — Total recoveries: 379,157 — Total tested: 14,604,942Map.
  3. Trump administration: Mike Pence's press secretary returns to work after beating coronavirus.
  4. States: New York reports lowest number of new coronavirus deaths since March.
  5. Public health: The final data for remdesivir is in and its benefits are rather limited.
  6. Education: A closer look at how colleges can reopenNotre Dame president says science alone "cannot provide the answer" to reopening.
  7. What should I do? Hydroxychloroquine questions answeredTraveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

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Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Pentagon watchdog sidelined by Trump resigns

Fine testiying before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2017. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Glenn Fine, the Pentagon's principal deputy inspector general, submitted his resignation on Tuesday.

Why it matters: President Trump removed Fine as the Pentagon's acting inspector general in April 7 after a group of independent federal watchdogs selected him to lead the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee, which was set up to oversee the rollout of the $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill.