Photo: Scott Heins/Getty Images

Michael Bloomberg's presidential campaign unveiled plans this morning to cut carbon from transportation, the nation's biggest source of greenhouse gas emissions.

The big picture: It's the latest of several climate and energy plans from Bloomberg, including proposals this week around wildfires, climate resilience, and emissions from buildings.

Driving the news: Here are a few pillars of the wide-ranging plan...

  • Add a national zero-emissions vehicle standard — "so that, by 2035, 100% of new vehicles are pollution-free."
  • Expand availability of EV tax credits and a launch a "Clean Cars for All" program that provides rebates for low and moderate-income families to trade in older vehicles.
  • Develop new mileage and emissions requirements for heavy-duty vehicles so that 15% of new trucks and buses are "pollution free" by 2030. Create a voucher program to incentivize fleet owners to trade in old trucks and buses.
  • Make new federal investments in EV charging infrastructure, mass transit, high-speed rail, and make areas more bike- and walking-friendly. Plus, add new incentives for moving freight from highways onto electric railways.
  • Overhaul the current national ethanol mandate to become a low-carbon fuels standard, "requiring reductions in the carbon content and giving credit to both electric charging and biofuels."

Quick take: The plan is ambitious (though so are his rivals'), but major portions of it would require new action from Congress, notably tax code changes and big new investments.

Go deeper: Mike Bloomberg releases his first domestic climate plan

Go deeper

10 mins ago - Health

239 scientists call on WHO to recognize coronavirus as airborne

People walk at the boardwalk in Venice Beach. Photo: APU GOMES/AFP via Getty Images

A group of 239 scientists in 32 countries are calling for the World Health Organization to revise its recommendations to account for airborne transmission as a significant factor in how the coronavirus spreads, the New York Times reports.

The big picture: The World Health Organization has said the virus mainly spreads via large respiratory droplets that fall to the ground once they've been discharged in coughs and sneezes. But the scientists say evidence shows the virus can spread from smaller particles that linger in air indoors.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 11,294,859 — Total deaths: 531,419 — Total recoveries — 6,078,552Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 2,839,917 — Total deaths: 129,676 — Total recoveries: 894,325 — Total tested: 34,858,427Map.
  3. States: Photos of America's pandemic July 4 ICU beds in Arizona hot spot near capacity.
  4. Public health: U.S. coronavirus infections hit record highs for 3 straight days.
  5. Politics: Trump extends PPP application deadlineKimberly Guilfoyle tests positive.
  6. World: Mexican leaders call for tighter border control as infections rise in U.S.
  7. Sports: 31 MLB players test positive as workouts resume.
  8. 1 📽 thing: Drive-in movie theaters are making a comeback.

Protesters toss Columbus statue into Baltimore’s Inner Harbor

Christopher Columbus statue in Columbus Piazza in Little Italy on April 9, 2015 in Baltimore. Photo: Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Protesters in Baltimore on Saturday toppled a statue of Christopher Columbus and tossed it into the city's Inner Harbor, the Baltimore Sun reports.

Why it matters: It's the latest monument toppled by demonstrators during the protests against racism and police brutality. Statues of Confederate soldiers and slave owners have been a flashpoint in the protests.