Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

AP Photo/Cliff Owen

The Senate's health care bill is dead, and Sen. John McCain cast the deciding vote to kill it. Shortly after midnight, McCain — along with Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins — voted not to adopt the"skinny repeal" bill that had become Republicans' last ditch effort to keep hopes of repealing at least part of the Affordable Care Act alive. The bill ultimately failed 49-51.

Trump tweets: "3 Republicans and 48 Democrats let the American people down. As I said from the beginning, let ObamaCare implode, then deal. Watch!"

  • As the vote approached, McCain was talking on the floor with Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer, who came away smiling, and Republican Whip John Cornyn, who flashed a thumbs-down sign.
  • GOP leaders held a separate vote open for roughly an hour as they tried to prevent their bill from collapsing. Vice President Mike Pence intensely lobbied McCain, who was flanked by Collins and Murkowski.
  • Both Schumer and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell got a little emotional as they addressed the chamber after the vote was finally called, a little after 1:30 a.m. — McConnell while talking about how long Republicans have been promising to repeal the ACA, and Schumer when acknowledging McCain's speech this week about bipartisanship.

McCain returned to the Capitol in dramatic fashion earlier this week after being diagnosed with brain cancer, and GOP leaders couldn't have begun the health-care debate without his vote. But he went on to sharply criticize the process through which the bill was drafted, and said he wouldn't vote for the measure unless he was sure it wouldn't become law.

"It's time to move on," McConnell said after the vote.

"I regret that we're here, but I want to say again I'm proud of the vote I cast tonight, consistent with what we told the American people we'd try to accomplish, in four straight elections," McConnell said.

Go deeper

Ina Fried, author of Login
1 hour ago - Technology

CES was largely irrelevant this year

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Forced online by the pandemic and overshadowed by the attack on the Capitol, the 2021 edition of CES was mostly an afterthought as media's attention focused elsewhere.

Why it matters: The consumer electronics trade show is the cornerstone event for the Consumer Technology Association and Las Vegas has been the traditional early-January gathering place for the tech industry.

The FBI is tracing a digital trail to Capitol rioters

Illustration: Sarah Grillo

Capitol rioters, eager to share proof of their efforts with other extremists online, have so far left a digital footprint of at least 140,000 images that is making it easier for federal law enforcement officials to capture and arrest them.

The big picture: Law enforcement's use of digital tracing isn't new, and has long been at the center of fierce battles over privacy and civil liberties. The Capitol siege is opening a fresh front in that debate.

Off the Rails

Episode 6: Last stand in Georgia

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Drew Angerer, Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 6: Georgia had not backed a Democratic presidential candidate since 1992 and Donald Trump's defeat in this Deep South stronghold, and his reaction to that loss, would help cost Republicans the U.S. Senate as well. Georgia was Trump's last stand.

On Air Force One, President Trump was in a mood. He had been clear he did not want to return to Georgia, and yet somehow he'd been conscripted into another rally on the night of Jan. 4.