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Frank Augstein / AP

The political future of the United Kingdom is up in the air after Prime Minister Theresa May failed to win a majority in a snap election she herself called — expecting to expand the Conservative mandate heading into Brexit negotiations.

Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour Party, has called on May to resign. The pressure is already building from some in her own party as well.

The Conservatives are projected to win 318 seats, 8 shy of a majority, down 12 seats from the 2015 result.

What's next: The Conservatives will try and form a minority government or a formal coalition, with the Democratic Unionist Party of Northern Ireland (which won 10 seats) playing a key role in either arrangement. If the solution doesn't prove stable, the U.K. could be in for another election before long.

Read more: How a government can be formed, Britons broke the anti-elite fever

Big takeaways

  • This is a huge victory for Corbyn, who has been ridiculed even within his own party since snatching the leadership in 2015 as a fringe figure leading Labour into irrelevance. His position is greatly strengthened.
  • The BBC reports that May gave "somber" remarks at Conservative HQ, saying "things will change" but not discussing her future as leader.
  • Brexit Delay? EU Commissioner Gunther Oettinger says Brexit talks might not now start as planned on June 19, per the Telegraph's Chris Hope.
  • Nick Clegg, former Deputy Prime Minister and leader of the centrist Liberal Democrats, lost his seat.
  • From the Financial Times' Robert Shrimsley: "It's almost as if Theresa May looked at Hillary's campaign and said: 'Let's do that.'"
  • If May does not hold on, she would be the shortest-serving P.M since the 1920's.
  • Scenes from election night: One seat decided by 2 votes, candidate named "Lord Buckethead" challenges May

Results (7 seats left to be called)

  • Conservatives: 313
  • Labour: 260
  • Scottish National Party: 35
  • Liberal Democrats: 12
  • Democratic Unionists: 10
  • Other: 13

Go deeper

36 mins ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.

The perils of organizing underground

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Researchers see one bright spot as far-right extremists turn to private and encrypted online platforms: Friction.

Between the lines: For fringe organizers, those platforms may provide more security than open social networks, but they make it harder to recruit new members.