Nov 25, 2019

Buttigieg's new plan for long-term care

Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg is out this morning with a new plan to shore up long-term care, along with other retirement-related priorities.

Why it matters: Older people caucus, and long-term care is an enormous strain on millions of families.

The big picture: Medicare doesn’t cover the services performed in nursing homes or by home health aides.

  • Medicaid does, but families often have to sell their homes and spend all their money to become poor enough to get Medicaid.
  • Some pay out of pocket, but the costs can be astronomical.

How it works: The cornerstone of Buttigieg’s plan is a stipend to help people cover their long-term care costs — $90 per day, which the campaign says “would kick in after an income-related waiting period.”

  • Medicaid today only covers long-term care for people who have less than $2,000 in assets. Buttigieg proposes raising that to $10,000.
  • He has endorsed a $15/hour minimum wage and argues that this would help expand the long-term care workforce.
  • The plan also calls for mandating Medicaid coverage either at home or in a nursing home — home care can be harder to come by today.

Go deeper: The looming crisis in long-term care

Go deeper

Updated 14 mins ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: Protesters and police clash nationwide over George Floyd

A firework explodes behind a line of police officers next to the Colorado State Capitol during a protest over the death of George Floyd in Denver on May 30. Photo : Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Police used tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray as the protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd continued nationwide into early Sunday.

The big picture: Police responded over the weekend with force, in cities ranging from Salt Lake City to Atlanta to Des Moines, Houston to Detroit, Milwaukee to Washington, D.C., Denver and Louisville. Large crowds gathered in Minneapolis on Saturday for the fifth day in a row.

Updated 41 mins ago - Politics & Policy

George Floyd protests: What you need to know

Photo: David Dee Delgado/Getty Images

Clashes erupted between police and protesters in several major U.S. cities Saturday night as demonstrations over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black men spread across the country.

The big picture: Floyd's death in Minneapolis police custody is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

Massive demonstrations put police response to unrest in the spotlight

Washington State Police use tear gas to disperse a crowd in Seattle during a demonstration protesting the death of George Floyd. Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

The response of some officers during demonstrations against police brutality in the U.S. has been criticized for being excessive by some officials and Black Lives Matter leaders.

Why it matters: The situation is tense across the U.S., with reports of protesters looting and burning buildings. While some police have responded with restraint and by monitoring the protests, others have used batons, tear gas, rubber bullets and other devices to disperse protesters and, in some cases, journalists.