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Cliff Owen / AP

Marine Corps members have been sharing nude photos of female service members on a private Facebook group called "Marines United," as Thomas Brennan originally reported. But this extends through every military branch and beyond Facebook, too. It's also on a web site, called AnonIB, which dates back to at least May 2016, according to Business Insider.

  • The Facebook group was 30,000 Marine Corps officers strong, and members reportedly encouraged each other to commit sexual assault. On the web site, they posted requests asking for photographs of specific colleagues' naked body parts, identifying them by name or where they are stationed.
  • After Brennan's story dropped, many left the Facebook group and found the site, where a Dropbox folder, "Girls of MU" with thousands of photographs inside, was posted in an effort to see the photos before the Facebook group was deleted.

Up next: The Marine Corps opened an investigation, and they are considering felony charges which would put Marine Corps members in prison for up to seven years, according to the Naval Criminal Investigative Service. Marine Commandant Gen. Robert Neller will brief the House Armed Services Committee next week.

The big picture: The Pentagon has been criticized in the past for not dealing with sexual assaults. In 2014 Rand Corporation found more than 20,000 service members had been sexually assaulted the previous year. Six times that number reported being sexually harassed, and in some cases the military has kicked out members who report sexual assaults.

Go deeper

Updated 37 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

Screenshot: Fox News

President Trump has delivered a farewell speech and departed Washington for the last time on Air Force One, kicking off the day that will culminate with President-elect Joe Biden taking office.

What's next: The inaugural celebration for young Americans is being livestreamed, starting at 10am.

Updated 53 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump departs on final Air Force One flight

President Trump and his family took off on Air Force One at 9 a.m. on Wednesday morning for the final time en route to Florida.

The big picture: Trump's final hours as president were punctuated by his decisions to snub his successor's inauguration and grant pardons to many of his allies who have been swept up in corruption scandals.

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
2 hours ago - Economy & Business

Janet Yellen said all the right things to reassure the markets

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Treasury Secretary nominee and former Fed chair Janet Yellen's confirmation hearing before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday showed markets just what they can expect from the administration of President-elect Joe Biden: more of what they got under President Trump — at least for now.

What it means: Investors and big companies reaped the benefits of ultralow U.S. interest rates and low taxes for most of Trump's term as well as significant increases in government spending, even before the coronavirus pandemic.

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