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Young people in U.S. dying at high rates

Life expectancy for Americans ages 25 to 64 has not kept pace with other wealthy countries, decreasing for the third year in a row, a comprehensive study published Tuesday in JAMA shows.

Why it matters: Death rates among young and middle-age adults stemmed mostly from suicide, drug overdose, obesity and liver disease.

By the numbers: Researchers looked at mortality data from the past 60 years. Death rates of people ages 25 to 34 jumped 29% from 2010 to 2017.

  • Middle-aged women's risk of death from a drug overdose rose by 486% between 1999 and 2017; men saw a 351% increase.
  • Women also experienced a bigger relative increase in risk of suicide and alcohol-related liver disease.

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